Watch: How you fight opioid addiction — with opioids

first_imgHealthWATCH: How you fight opioid addiction — with opioids [email protected] Alex Hogan @hoganalex Watch: ‘Like you’re living in hell’: A survivor on what opioid withdrawal did to his body Tags drug abuseopioids By Alex Hogan March 23, 2017 Reprints In the video above, Lukas explains the history and science of these opioid treatment medications.The stakes could not be higher for those addicted to opioids. More than 30,000 Americans died in 2015 from illicit drugs like heroin or prescription drugs such as OxyContin and fentanyl. The epidemic has surpassed the height of the HIV/AIDS crisis in terms of yearly death toll.center_img For those struggling with opioid addiction, breaking the habit can be demanding. Scott Lukas is researching and developing drugs to treat the condition. Alex Hogan/STAT About the Author Reprints Senior Multimedia Producer Alex coordinates video production and STAT Brand Studio projects. For the millions of Americans struggling with opioid addiction, breaking the habit can be physically and psychologically demanding.Those who quit abruptly can experience violent withdrawal symptoms for up to 10 days, and once those subside, they still have to cope with anxiety and intense cravings. Relapse is common.Scott Lukas, director of the Behavioral Psychopharmacology Research Laboratory at McLean Hospital in Belmont, Mass., has spent much of his career researching and developing drugs to treat opioid addiction. Many of the drugs on the market are opioids themselves, but are formulated to deter abuse, while minimizing withdrawal symptoms.advertisement Using opioids to beat back an addiction to themVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2017/03/23/opioid-addiction-withdrawal/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0003:1303:13  Related:last_img read more

DNA sleuths read the coronavirus genome, tracing its origins and looking for dangerous mutations

first_img Unfortunately, genetic analysis can’t identify what animal species the coronavirus jumped from into humans. But an analysis by a team from the Wuhan Institute of Virology, posted to the preprint server bioRxiv, determined that the genome of this coronavirus (the seventh known to infect humans) is 96% identical to that of a bat coronavirus, suggesting that species is the original source. (Writing in the New England Journal of Medicine on Friday, another team of scientists in China reported that the new coronavirus is 86.9% identical to the bat SARS-like coronavirus.)Virologists differ on whether it’s possible to read out viral properties from just the genome sequence, such as whether the microbe is spread by coughing, sneezing, touching, or merely breathing. But the analysis by the Wuhan Institute team found that it enters human cells using the same doorway that SARS did. Called angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the door is a receptor to which a “spike protein” on the virus’s surface first attaches and then enables the virus to fuse with the host cell.If ACE2 is “druggable,” blocking it could conceivably treat 2019-nCoV. “It should be expected and worth to test if ACE2 targeting … drugs can be used for nCoV-2019 patients,” the scientists wrote.The genome sequences have more to give. They “will be crucially important for development of diagnostics [and] vaccines,” said biologist Richard Ebright of Rutgers University.For instance, the genome-editing technology CRISPR is the basis for Cambridge, Mass.-based startup Sherlock Biosciences’ diagnostics, which promise to slash how long it takes to make a definitive identification. In the U.S, that’s now done only by sending samples to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses a technology invented in the 1980s, polymerase chain reaction or PCR, to identify the presence of coronavirus.“Our vision is that our [CRISPR-based] SHERLOCK and INSPECTR platforms are tailor-made for outbreaks like coronavirus,” said Sherlock CEO Rahul Dhanda, who declined to discuss “specific plans related to coronavirus.”And as scientists keep adding 2019-nCoV genome sequences to their collection, they could get an early glimpse of whether the virus is mutating in a way that could make it more dangerous or more transmissible. “You need continuous sequencing,” Andersen said.Correction: This story has been corrected to make clear that the coronavirus genome is made of RNA, not DNA. About the Author Reprints Leave this field empty if you’re human: Given what’s known about the pace at which viral genomes mutate, if nCoV had been circulating in humans since significantly before the first case was reported on Dec. 8, the 24 genomes would differ more. Applying ballpark rates of viral evolution, Rambaut estimates that the Adam (or Eve) virus from which all others are descended first appeared no earlier than Oct. 30, 2019, and no later than Nov. 29.The progenitor virus itself was almost certainly one that circulates harmlessly in bats (as SARS does) but has an “intermediate reservoir” in one or more animals that come into contact with people, Andersen said. Presumably, that reservoir is one of the species of animals at the Wuhan market thought to be ground zero for the outbreak. The ancestor of 2019-nCoV existed in that species for some unknown time, never infecting people, until by chance a single virus acquired a mutation that made it capable of jumping into and infecting humans.The genome sequences suggest that was a one-time-only jump. “The genomes [from the 24 samples] are very uniform,” Andersen said. “If there had been multiple introductions,” including from many different animals, “there would be more genomic diversity. This was a single introduction.”That means that what’s sustaining the spread is human-to-human transmission (suggesting that closing Wuhan’s animal market is very much an after-the-horse-has-fled-the-barn reaction). Please enter a valid email address. “The genetics can tell us the true timing of the first cases” and whether they occurred earlier than officials realized, said molecular biologist Kristian Andersen of Scripps Research, an expert on viral genomes. “It can also tell us how the outbreak started — from a single event of a virus jumping from an infected animal to a person or from a lot of animals being infected. And the genetics can tell us what’s sustaining the outbreak — new introductions from animals or human-to-human transmission.”Scientists in China sequenced the virus’s genome and made it available on Jan. 10, just a month after the Dec. 8 report of the first case of pneumonia from an unknown virus in Wuhan. In contrast, after the SARS outbreak began in late 2002, it took scientists much longer to sequence that coronavirus. It peaked in February 2003 — and the complete genome of 29,727 nucleotides wasn’t sequenced until that April.advertisement Newsletters Sign up for STAT China Your guide to the biggest biopharma and life sciences news in China Sharon Begley In the LabDNA sleuths read the coronavirus genome, tracing its origins and looking for dangerous mutations Privacy Policy Support STAT: STAT is offering coverage of the coronavirus for free. Please consider a subscription to support our journalism. Start free trial today.Since the sequencing of the first 2019-nCoV sample, from an early patient, scientists have completed nearly two dozen more, said Andrew Rambaut of the University of Edinburgh, an expert on viral evolution. That pace is “unprecedented and completely unbelievable,” said Andersen, who worked on sequencing the Ebola genome during the 2014 outbreak. “It’s just insane.”The genome of the Wuhan virus is 29,903 bases long, one of many clues that have led scientists to believe it is very similar to SARS.By comparing the two dozen genomes, scientists can address the “when did this start” question. The 24 available samples, including from Thailand and Shenzhen as well as Wuhan, show “very limited genetic variation,” Rambaut concluded on an online discussion forum where virologists have been sharing data and analyses. “This is indicative of a relatively recent common ancestor for all these viruses.” By Sharon Begley Jan. 24, 2020 Reprints New coronavirus can cause infections with no symptoms and sicken otherwise healthy people, studies show As infectious disease specialists and epidemiologists race to contain the outbreak of the novel coronavirus centered on Wuhan, China, they’re getting backup that’s been possible only since the explosion in genetic technologies: a deep-dive into the genome of the virus known as 2019-nCoV.Analyses of the viral genome are already providing clues to the origins of the outbreak and even possible ways to treat the infection, a need that is becoming more urgent by the day: Early on Saturday in China, health officials reported 15 new fatalities in a single day, bringing the death toll to 41. There are now nearly 1,100 confirmed cases there.Reading the genome (which is made of RNA, not DNA) also allows researchers to monitor how 2019-nCoV is changing and provides a roadmap for developing a diagnostic test and a vaccine.advertisement Related: Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. @sxbegle [email protected] Electron micrographs of isolated 2019-nCoV particles (left), and in cells from human airways (right), marked with arrows. The New England Journal of Medicine Tags BostonChinaCoronavirusCRISPRgeneticsglobal healthinfectious diseaselast_img read more

Laois man is setting out to claim new Guinness World Record in 500 mile challenge

first_img Pinterest Previous articlePurcell says removal of the Joe McDonagh Cup Champion 15 is ‘unfair’ and ‘disappointing’ for Laois playersNext articleIn Pictures: Two Laois organisations win big at the National Lottery Good Causes Awards Aedín DunneAedín graduated from University of Limerick with a degree in Journalism and New Media. She is a proud Townie with a passion for all things sports and doesn’t like to speak about the 2016 blip in Portlaoise’s bid to 10-in-a-row. Facebook An Abbeyleix man is setting out to set a New Guinness World Record this coming February.Gary O’Keeffe aims to do so by being part of the first Team of Adventurers to traverse a 500 mile expanse of frozen ice on Motor Bikes.O’Keeffe and his Clare teammate, Declan McEvoy, will head up a group of international adventure motorcyclists on an epic journey to one of the most dangerous, under-documented natural, cultural & historical landmarks in the world – Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia.In the depths of a frozen Siberian winter, the team will undertake a world record-breaking attempt to traverse Lake Baikal’s frozen, ice pack surface by motorbike.It will take place from Siberia to Russia in Lake Baikal which is 500 miles long and one mile deep and will take up to three weeks, eight of those days on ice.If that didn’t sound tough enough, temperatures will be as low as -60 degrees Celsius.Preparations for this World Record attempt have been on going for the last 24 months and are now at the final stages.The Baikal Project is set to be filmed and directed by multi award-winning adventure filmmaker, Claudio Von Planta while BBC World have committed to the project and we are in advanced talks with Netflix and other Steaming Providers.Aside from this, Gary is also attempting to visit every country in the world and is currently up to number 86. You can follow his journey here on his blog.We wish the best to Gary and his teammate as they take on this challenge in just three months time!SEE ALSO – Two Laois ladies complete The Corinthian Challenge for Irish Injured Jockeys WhatsApp GAA Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results GAA TAGSAbbeyleixGary O’KeeffeNew Guinness World RecordThe Baikal Project Twitter Twitter Home We Are Laois Laois man is setting out to claim new Guinness World Record in… We Are Laois Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory Facebook WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By Aedín Dunne – 4th November 2019 Laois man is setting out to claim new Guinness World Record in 500 mile challenge 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin GAA Pinterestlast_img read more

Newly Restored Birth Home of Bustamante to be Reopened on February 24

first_imgNewly Restored Birth Home of Bustamante to be Reopened on February 24 UncategorizedJanuary 11, 2007 RelatedNewly Restored Birth Home of Bustamante to be Reopened on February 24 FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail The newly restored birth home of national hero Sir Alexander Bustamante will be reopened and dedicated on February 24, as part of activities to mark the 123rd anniversary of his birth.The event will also include the launch of an exhibition on the life of the national hero.The home, located in Blenheim, Hanover, was destroyed by bushfire in March 2004 and was recently rebuilt by the Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT), which also mounted the exhibition. The home is a national heritage site.Representative from the JNHT, Joan Andrea Hutchinson, while addressing a planning meeting for the birthday celebrations held recently at the offices of the Hanover Parish Council, informed that in addition to the impressive permanent exhibition, the restoration project included putting in new security, water supply and sprinkler systems, while the buttery was rebuilt.Marjorie Leydon-Vernon, Western Regional Manager for the Jamaica Cultural Development Commission (JCDC), which organized the meeting, expressed enthusiasm about the upcoming celebration and the collaborative effort among various agencies, adding that plans were on target for a memorable affair.“This year, the celebration is going to be extra special..the house has been restored by the JNHT and it will be a joint celebration with the JNHT this year. We are working closely to ensure that we have a great event”, she stated.She told JIS News that residents of western Jamaica and across the island were expected to attend in the event.Mrs. Leydon-Vernon further praised the Hanover Parish Council for its support of the activities of the parish’s cultural committee over the years, adding that several private sector agencies have also been generous in supporting the annual event in recognition of a great son of the parish. RelatedNewly Restored Birth Home of Bustamante to be Reopened on February 24center_img RelatedNewly Restored Birth Home of Bustamante to be Reopened on February 24 Advertisementslast_img read more

E3 statement on Iran to IAEA Board of Governors, November 2020

first_imgE3 statement on Iran to IAEA Board of Governors, November 2020 Thank you Chair,France, Germany, and the United Kingdom would like to thank the Director General for his latest report (GOV/2020/51) and the Deputy Director General for his Technical Briefing. We commend the Agency for its timely, independent and objective reporting.As participants to the JCPoA, we reiterate our continued commitment to the preservation and full implementation of the nuclear agreement. We E3 have worked hard to preserve the agreement. We have been consistently clear that we regret the US withdrawal from the JCPoA and re-imposition of US sanctions. We have liftedsanctions as foreseen by the JCPoA and taken additional efforts to allow Iran to pursue legitimate trade, by developing the financial mechanism INSTEX.However, despite these good faith efforts, Iran has engaged, for a year and a half now, in numerous, serious violations of its nuclear commitments. We continue to be extremely concerned by Iran’s actions, which are hollowing out the core nonproliferation benefits of the deal. Advancements on Research & Development haveirreversible consequences.We are concerned at Iran enriching uranium above the 3.67% JCPoA limit, and the continued growth of its low-enriched uranium stockpile, which is now 2443 kg. This is a dozen times the JCPOA limit. Contrary to the JCPoA, Iran is using advanced centrifuges for the production of low-enriched uranium (LEU). Contrary to the JCPoA,Iran is also enriching at Fordow: this facility has no credible civilian use.Iran also continues to conduct research and development on several types of advanced centrifuges not permitted under the JCPoA and the JCPoA’s R&D Plan. This includes the operation of hundreds of IR-2m, IR-4 and IR-6 centrifuges. Iran has also introduced new types of centrifuges not authorized under the JCPoA. Iran must ceaseundertaking any research and development of advanced centrifuges contrary to the provisions of the JCPoA.On top of this, Iran has announced that it intends to install advanced centrifuges at the Fuel Enrichment Plant at Natanz. The IAEA report confirms this process has already started: one full cascade of IR2m centrifuges is now installed at the FEP, as well as some IR4 centrifuges. The report also indicates that these cascades will continue to accumulate uranium. The IAEA reported on 17 November that the process of feeding the IR2m cascade with UF6 has now been initiated.The JCPoA is clear that all centrifuge research and development should be undertaken at the PFEP. The JCPoA is also clear that only IR-1 centrifuges may be installed at the FEP for enrichment purposes and that their number is limited to no more than 5060. Iran’s latest decision to change the location of its research and development activities, which are already being conducted in ways that are inconsistent with the JCPoA, as well as increasing the overall number of centrifuges installed at the FEP, is a matter of deep concern. It makes it easier for Iran to expand its activities with advanced centrifuges in the future should it decide to do so. The FEP has space for thousands of additional centrifuges, therefore moving advanced centrifuges to a larger space raises serious concerns about Iranian intent. We urge Iran not to proceed with the installation of advanced centrifuges at the Fuel Enrichment Plant, and its plans to move its R&D facility to the FEP. These activities constitute afurther violation of the JCPoA and send an unacceptable signal to the broader international community that has rallied in support of preserving the JCPoA.It is now critical that Iran immediately reverses its steps and returns to full compliance with the JCPoA without further delay. We remain committed to working with all JCPoA participants to find a diplomatic way forward and we intend to pursue these discussions within the framework of the JCPoA.Chair,We commend the Agency for its continued and intense efforts to engage Iran in a substantial dialogue to evaluate Iran’s declarations under its Additional Protocol.We take note of Iran’s implementation of its legal obligations under the Additional Protocol to its Safeguards Agreement by providing the IAEA with complementary access to sites and locations in Iran, including access to two locations which were the subject of this Board’s attention recently. We expect Iran to fully cooperate with theIAEA in accordance with its nuclear obligations, including by answering all questions that the Agency may have in the coming months once the proper evaluation of the samples taken at these undeclared locations is completed.Paragraphs 33-35 of the Director General’s report clearly state that Iran’s responses to questions on the presence of uranium particles of anthropogenic origin detected at an undeclared site, which were provided by Iran after very significant delays, were ‘not technically credible’. These delays and unsatisfactory responses are unacceptable.We welcome the DG’s clear reporting on this matter and his efforts to follow up the issue with Iran.In June, this Board, in a Resolution adopted by a large majority, called on Iran to comply with its safeguards obligations and to cooperate fully and without delay with the Agency. We recall Iran’s legally binding safeguards obligations. In order to alleviate concerns over possible undeclared and unaccounted for nuclear material andactivities, it is of critical importance that Iran should promptly provide a full and accurate explanation to the Agency on this issue, as well as on other safeguards-related issues being currently investigated by the Agency. We would welcome further updates, as appropriate, to the next Board of Governors, as the investigation progresses.We once again thank the IAEA for its latest quarterly report on Iran and express our full confidence in its capacity to engage its mandate in a rigorous and impartial manner.We call on the Agency to continue to provide further detailed technical updates, as appropriate, and would welcome a decision to make its latest quarterly report public.Thank you. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:agreement, community, dialogue, diplomatic, France, Germany, Government, IAEA, investigation, Iran, operation, production, research, resolution, sanctions, U.S., UK, UK Government, United Kingdomlast_img read more

RCAF announces pilot for 2021 CF-18 Demonstration Team

first_imgRCAF announces pilot for 2021 CF-18 Demonstration Team From: National DefenceThe Royal Canadian Air Force is pleased to announce the appointment of Captain Dan Deluce as the pilot for the 2021 CF-18 Demonstration Team.The Royal Canadian Air Force is pleased to announce the appointment of Captain Dan Deluce as the pilot for the 2021 CF-18 Demonstration Team.Captain Deluce will wow audiences across Canada during the 2021 air show season. Captain Deluce was originally selected to fly with the CF-18 Demonstration Team in 2020 before the season was unfortunately cancelled due to COVID-19.Captain Daniel DeluceCaptain Daniel Deluce has been an avid aviation fan his whole life. Coming from a large aviation family, he was especially interested in fighter aircraft growing up, thanks to his grandfather who was a Royal Canadian Air Force Hurricane pilot during the Second World War.Born and raised in Toronto, Ontario, Captain Deluce attended many airshows throughout his life and his fondest memories are of attending the Toronto airshow with his family. During which he was always envious of the people who got to fly above the crowds over his hometown.Thanks to his father, a commercial pilot of forty years, Captain Deluce started flying aircraft as a child. Beginning with basic aircraft handling and aircraft attitudes, his father’s lessons eventually evolved into family trips flying small floatplanes into fishing camps with Daniel or one of his siblings at the controls. It was these early childhood experiences in aviation that led him to pursue his private pilot’s license at 16 years old.Studying chemical engineering at the University of Toronto only strengthened Captain Deluce’s desire to fly high performance aircraft. To him, aviation represented the most amazing blend of science and technology, nature, and the human desire to push the limits. After graduation in 2006, he completed his civilian commercial pilot license with a multi-engine instrument rating.Captain Deluce then moved to Northern Ontario to work for an air charter and medevac company. After many long months working as a dispatcher, he started flying as a co-pilot on a PC-12 aircraft. He continued flying with the company until 2010 when he was accepted into the RCAF and was given the opportunity to follow his dream of becoming a fighter pilot.After completing basic and second language training in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, Captain Deluce began flight training in 2012. Upon completion of phase II flight training at 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, he was selected to fly jet aircraft and continued training on the CT-155 Hawk, where he would go on to receive his RCAF pilot’s wings.In 2015 following successful completion of the Fighter Pilot Course on the CF-188 Hornet at 410 Tactical Fighter (Operational Training) Squadron at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alberta, Captain Deluce was posted to 409 Tactical Fighter Squadron at 4 Wing where he served for three years as a combat-qualified element lead and tactical instructor pilot.Captain Deluce began his current position in 2018 as an instructor at 419 Tactical Fighter (Training) Squadron, teaching Canada’s newest aspiring fighter pilots under the NATO Flying Training in Canada program. He is currently dual qualified on the CT-155 Hawk and continues to fly the CF-188 in training and operational roles. Captain Deluce has actively trained throughout Canada and the United States with the Hornet, and has served on NORAD missions across Canada. In 2017 he also deployed to Romania as part of Operation REASSURANCE, Canada’s contribution to NATO enhanced air policing.QuotesIt is an honour and a pleasure flying the CF-18 for Canada and representing the RCAF, and I am looking forward to sharing my passion for aviation with Canadians next summer. After a challenging year, I hope our shows help lift some spirits and remind everyone how resilient we can be in the face of adversity. At the same time I want to share with you what the RCAF is capable of, and demonstrate our commitment to serving Canadians no matter the conditions.”Captain Daniel Deluce, CF-18 Demonstration Team PilotQuick factsEvery year, the Royal Canadian Air Force selects a special group of people to make up the CF-18 Demonstration Team. The CF-18 Demonstration Team is a truly national team; its members all come from RCAF units across the country, and all are selected for their superior performance, dedication to excellence, and the desire to represent Canada’s operational air force.The team comprises 13 members including the Demo pilot, eight technicians, three safety pilots and a public affairs officer/narrator.The eight technicians are split into two teams of four. The East crew from 3 Wing Bagotville, Quebec, take care of the jet during shows on the East coast and the West crew from 4 Wing take care of the West coast. The technicians drive to each show site bringing their trailer that contain the necessary tools and parts to maintain the CF-18 Demo jet. Throughout the 2021 air show season the Demo team technicians will travel across Canada ensuring the Demo jet is fit to fly.It is expected that 2021 will be an air show season unlike any other and in all cases RCAF members will adhere to applicable Provincial/Territorial, regional, and municipal Public Health measures, including the use of non-medical masks.To protect both members of the CF-18 Demonstration Team and all Canadians, members of the team will be sequestered from the public and non-essential personnel at air shows.Community outreach and education is the most important part of the CF-18 Demonstration Team’s mission. To this end, the team will increase their use of virtual tools to engage Canadians during 2021. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:air force, Canada, childhood, community, demonstration, education, Engineering, Government, Hurricane, NATO, operation, public health, Romania:, technology, United States, university, University of Torontolast_img read more

2020: A photo year in review

first_img2020: A photo year in reviewPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Thursday, December 31, 2020in: Newsshare 0 Clark County Today offers this 2020 Year in Review with photos from award-winning photographer Mike SchultzClark County Today continues its look back on 2020 with this Year in Review through photos from award-winning photographer Mike Schultz.The past 12 months was dominated by the coronavirus pandemic and Clark County Today provided area residents with the news that impacted this community locally. There was also social and political unrest that led to protests and rallies and other events and news as well.We hope you enjoy this visual glimpse back at 2020.Photo by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzPhoto by Mike SchultzAdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestshare 0 Previous : Statewide ban on single-use plastic bags now set to begin at the end of January Next : The Reflector Newspaper sold to Chehalis-based ownersAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

Hyundai Elantra lineup grows with a new hatchback model

first_img See More Videos COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS Hyundai has officially revealed the latest addition to the Elantra lineup.The Elantra GT hatchback returns for the 2018 model year, bringing with it a supposedly sportier driving experience compared to its predecessor, as well as more interior room compared to its rivals.As before, the Elantra GT is closely related to the European-spec i30 hatchback. That means a new platform promising to be 22 per cent stiffer and 60 pounds – or 27 kilograms – lighter than the outgoing Elantra hatch. PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca advertisement RELATED TAGSElantraHyundaiNewsAutomotive EnginesAutomotive ReviewsAutomotive TechnologyCanadian International Auto ShowCars and Car DesignCulture and LifestyleHatchbacksHyundai ElantraHyundai Motor CompanyPassenger CarsScience and TechnologyTechnologyToronto Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GTHandout, Hyundai Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” We’ll bring you a closer look at the 2018 Hyundai Elantra GT from the Canadian International Auto Show in Toronto next week. center_img A normally aspirated 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine serves as the base engine, good for 162 horsepower, and it can be paired to either a six-speed manual or automatic transmission. If that’s not enough, Hyundai will also offer a spiced-up Elantra GT Sport. It’s pretty much a carbon copy of the Elantra Sport sedan under the skin, complete with the Sport’s 201-horsepower 1.6L turbo-four, independent rear suspension setup, transmission options and larger brakes.As for the non-greasy bits, the Elantra GT will come standard with LED daytime running lights and an infotainment system with an eight-inch touchscreen, plus Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity. The usual safety kit is available – including adaptive cruise control, emergency braking and blind-spot monitor, to name a few. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Trending Videos Trending in Canada Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.22018 Elantra GT The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever ‹ Previous Next ›last_img read more

RNA Lecture Series At CU-Boulder To Feature Two Talks Dec. 13, Dec. 14

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Nobel laureate Tom Cech will kick off a new lecture series at the University of Colorado at Boulder Dec. 13 spotlighting RNA science that features two distinguished Yale University experts in the fields of molecular biology and biochemistry. Organized by CU-Boulder’s chemistry and biochemistry department and molecular, cellular and developmental biology department, the new Dharmacon Distinguished Lectures in RNA will feature Thomas Steitz and Joan Steitz, both professors in the department of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University. Both also are investigators of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, headquartered in Chevy Chase, Md. Cech, a CU Distinguished Professor and current HHMI president, will open the new lecture series with a short talk at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 13, in room 142 of the Cristol Chemistry and Biochemistry building. Cech will be followed by Thomas Steitz, who will talk on the motion of macromolecular machines from 4:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. As the second part of the lecture series, Joan Steitz will give a lecture from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Dec 14 in room A2B70 of MCD biology. She will discuss ribonucleic proteins, or RNPs, and their role in gene expression. A public reception will be held after the talk for the two lecturers, who are husband and wife. The new lecture series is sponsored by Dharmacon Inc., a Boulder biotech company using CU-patented technology on the chemical synthesis of RNA. Dharmacon was founded in 1995 by CU-Boulder alum Steve Scaringe and is owned by ThermoFisher Scientific, an international corporation. The goal of the new lecture series is to showcase top-flight scientists working on different aspects of RNA chemistry, structure and biology, and to disseminate new knowledge and attract students into the field, said CU-Boulder Assistant Professor Robert Batey of the chemistry and biochemistry department. The lectures will be recorded on video and audio and be freely available to the scientific community. In addition to being an HHMI Investigator, Thomas Steitz is the Sterling Professor of Molecular Physics and Biochemistry and a chemistry professor at Yale. HHMI Investigator Joan Steitz is a professor at the Yale School of Medicine. Both are members of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Cech shared the 1989 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his CU-Boulder research team’s discovery that RNA could catalyze biochemical reactions. Cech became president of HHMI in 2000 and retains his faculty positions and lab on campus. For more information contact Batey at (303) 735-2159. Published: Dec. 7, 2006 last_img read more

CIRES-led study discovers high levels of air-cleansing compound over ocean

first_imgCIRES news releaseResearchers have detected the presence of a pollutant-destroying compound iodine monoxide in surprisingly high levels high above the tropical ocean, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.“The levels of IO we observed were much higher than expected,” said Rainer Volkamer, a CIRES fellow and principal investigator of the study. “The high concentrations in air that has not recently been in contact with the ocean surface point to the intriguing possibility of a recycling mechanism whereby instead of IO decaying away as previously thought, it’s released back to the atmosphere by heterogeneous chemistry on aerosol particles.”IO is an important chemical because it destroys ozone, a greenhouse gas that warms the planet and also indirectly lowers methane levels, said Volkamer, also an assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry. Additionally, IO can form aerosols—tiny particles suspended in the atmosphere that can initiate the production of clouds that can help cool the climate.If IO is recycled in the atmosphere, as the research findings suggest, “It means IO has a longer effective lifetime and is, thus, much more broadly distributed, affects a much broader atmospheric air mass, and can destroy much more ozone,” Volkamer said.The team’s analysis indicates that IO accounts for up to 20 percent of the overall ozone loss rate in the upper troposphere (the layer of the atmosphere extending from Earth’s surface up to about 60,000 feet). This ozone sink is currently missing in most atmospheric models.The origin of IO is thought to be iodine emitted by microalgae or inorganic reactions at the ocean surface. Because IO occurs in relatively very small concentrations—one in 1013 molecules—it previously had been impossible to quantify the amount in the upper atmosphere.  Volkamer’s team, however, solved that problem. They built an instrument— the University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument—attached it to a research plane, and flew it over the tropical Pacific during January 2010, collecting and analyzing air samples from about 300 feet up to 33,000 feet to create a vertical profile of the atmosphere’s composition. The efforts marked the first aircraft measurements of IO, and the results appeared online Jan. 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.During the flight, the researchers studied both stable, aged air, which has had no contact with the ocean surface in days, and a deep convective storm, which pumps warm, moist air from the ocean surface into the upper troposphere.Because IO has a very short lifetime in the atmosphere—it lasts only 30 to 60 minutes before forming aerosol particles—the researchers expected to find IO only near the ocean surface and in the storm cell, which acts like a “large vacuum cleaner, sucking air from the ocean surface up to 30,000 feet in as little as 20 minutes,” Volkamer said.Instead, they discovered high levels of IO even in aged air that had not connected with the ocean for several days.“Based on current understanding, iodine oxide shouldn’t be hanging around for more than one hour,” Volkamer said. “But these measurements reveal a surprising persistence of IO in air masses disconnected from the ground. We don’t see that the IO decays away. It still hangs around.”The persistence of IO suggests that IO isn’t irreversibly lost to aerosol, Volkamer said. The aerosol “returns” the IO to the atmosphere. Such a recycling mechanism would be novel because iodine is a very heavy atom. “It’s like a cannonball,” Volkamer said. “It tends to form polymers and stick onto particles. But a portion seems to be returning into the gas phase.”Such a recycling mechanism would extend the effective lifetime of IO, increasing the amount of ozone it destroys. The findings will help improve climate models’ predicative capability about how atmosphere behaves and how the atmosphere cleanses itself of pollutants and greenhouse gases, Volkamer said.The next step will be to elucidate the mechanisms behind IO’s high concentrations.“It’s exciting because the atmosphere has more cleansing mechanisms than we suspected,” Volkamer said.Co-authors on the study include Barbara Dix, Sunil Baidar, James F. Bresch, Samuel R. Hall, K. Sebastian Schmidt, and Siyuan Wang. The research is funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation. CIRES is a joint institute of CU-Boulder and NOAA.Contact:Kristin Bjornsen, CIRES science writer, 303-492-1790 [email protected] Rainer Volkamer, CIRES Fellow, [email protected] The research aircraft flies over the Pacific Ocean with its wing-mounted instrument. (Photo courtesy Rainer Volkamer) Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: Jan. 24, 2013 Categories:Science & TechnologyNews Headlineslast_img read more