Throwers and jumpers will step up – Riley

first_img Steady increase “If you look at what is happening at the junior level from 2010-2011, In 2010 as well as in 2012 and 2014, we had a steady increase in the number of juniors that were participating in non-track events. (For) triple jumpers, high jumpers, discus throwers, and shot putters, it was a growing number of persons who had attained the international qualifying standards in non-track events, including Dacres,” he said. “So we have a crop of field events people who are actually sticking with it, and as they are getting older, they are benefiting from greater mastery. We had persons in the past persons who were switching. That’s a factor; We usually lose them to other events. We have a crop of persons who are sticking to it. They like the events and we get a benefit from that,” said Riley. Dacres’ coach, Julian Robinson agreed with Riley, to a point. “The successful throwers now have been throwing for many years. “I think that Jamaica has the athletes to do well at the Olympics and WC, but for that to happen they are going to need support. If we can keep them in training for the next three to four years, we would likely get medals from them so the challenge is keeping our throwers in training,” said Robinson. Riley also pointed to Dacres’ throw in Sweden as a natural progression given his trajectory since 2011, when he won the World Youth title in Lille, France. “Dacres is not a light-weight. Against his peers he is the best and he is getting to the point that the people who are ahead of him are getting out of the sport. So it is a natural progression for someone who is consistently engaging himself in the activity,” Riley said. Many of the top athletes will return to the island for this weekend’s JAAA National Junior and Senior Championships at the National Stadium. Riley said he does not expect anything major to change this soon. “Participation should be strong and the role we have to play is to continue to encourage them by giving them the due attention that they need,” Riley said. As the world’s fastest sprinter, Usain Bolt, prepares to hang up his spikes after the 2017 IAAF World Championships in London, at least one coach is predicting that throwers and jumpers will save Jamaica’s medal tally at future Olympics and World Championships. “My Prediction: Throws & Jumps will save Jamaica’s Olympics & WC (World Championships) medal tally in the “Post-BoltEra,” Excelsior High School head coach David Riley said in a Facebook post on June 9. People have been taking note as Jamaica’s field event athletes have been winning titles on the United States College circuit this season. High jumper Christoff Bryan of Florida State University (FSU) won the NCAA Division One title at the recent championships; Danielle Dodd of Kent State University won the women’s shot put with a national record 19.15m, and Shadae Lawrence of Kansas State University won the women’s discus, with another Jamaican, Kellion Knibb of FSU in third. On Sunday, Fedrick Dacres, a former World Youth and World Junior discus Champion won the men’s discus at the IAAF Diamond League meet in Stockholm, Sweden. Riley, a long jump coach himself, says there has been a steady increase in the number of athletes who have been competing in the jumps and throws over the last six to seven years, and more importantly, those who come, stay.last_img read more

Adriano sinks Valencia to keep Barca top

first_imgIt also maintained their five-point lead over defending champions Real, who earlier beat Granada 3-0, Cristiano Ronaldo hitting a brace to reach a landmark 150 goals in 149 games for the capital club.Barca full-back Adriano’s drive from outside the area after 23 minutes was the only goal of the game at the Nou Camp against a Valencia side who battled hard but spent most of the game defending deeply.Former Arsenal midfielder Alex Song made his first start in a Barca shirt with Sergio Busquets rested and played alongside Xavi Hernandez and Cesc Fabregas who returned to the starting line-up.Roberto Soldado went within inches of giving Valencia the lead after 11 minutes with a 25-yard strike which whistled past the post.Lionel Messi had a header saved by keeper Diego Alves after 18 minutes but the Valencia shot-stopper could do nothing about Adriano’s sweetly struck drive minutes later.There may have been a change of coach in the summer with the departure of Pep Guardiola and the arrival of Tito Vilanova but the football has remained the same and Barca knocked the ball around inside the Valencia half in trademark fashion.Cesc had the opportunity to extend the lead but with time in the box after receiving the ball from Messi he dinked the ball wide. It has been a disappointing start to the campaign for Cesc and after the restart he blazed over from in front of goal.Valencia were hanging on but without a second goal Barca could not relax and had their hearts in their mouth several times especially when Victor Ruiz put the ball in the back of the net on the hour mark but was ruled off-side.Earlier in the evening, Cristiano Ronaldo hit a brace to help Real Madrid get their league campaign back against 10-man Granada.Despite their cup win the pressure was starting to grow on the team with just a point from their opening two league games but Ronaldo responded with a goal in either half to continue his remarkable scoring run in Madrid.The first owed as much to poor keeping from Antonio ‘Tono’ Rodriguez as the Portuguese’s shot from a tight angle after 25 minutes went through his legs, although it did take a slight deflection off Inigo Lopez.Ronaldo got his second after 53 minutes and Granada’s hopes of a comeback took a blow with Borja Gomez sent off six minutes later. Substitute Gonzalo Higuain completed the scoring with a tap-in 15 minutes from the end.Still Real lacked fluidity in their passing which Jose Mourinho pointed out afterwards.“I did not like the game as we had little rhythm. We have had little time to work this week and we were slow. We got the points but that is not enough, we have to play better,” he said.Luka Modric was given a starting place after he came on for the last few minutes against Barca and threaded the ball through to Jose Callejon inside the first few minutes but ‘keeper Tono got down well to block him.Ronaldo had looked sluggish in his first two league games and he failed to trouble the ‘keeper with a free-kick and a couple of shots from distance before he did break the deadlock with a soft goal from Granada’s perspective.The visitors had shown nothing going forward and were now forced to come out of their shells but it was Ronaldo that could have added a second before the break with a drive which Tono was alert to.Angel Di Maria came on after half time and he set up Ronaldo, who saw his shot from inside the box saved by Tono before reacting to knock home the rebound.Gomez was given his second yellow card for a foul on Ronaldo and then Higuain sealed the win from a Benzema pass.Earlier Rayo Vallecano drew 0-0 with Sevilla and Athletic Bilbao overcame Valladolid 2-0, while Levante dramatically came from behind to beat Espanyol 3-2, with defender Raul Rodriguez deflecting the ball into his own net in time added on to decide the game in the home side’s favour.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000MADRID, Spain, August 3 – Barcelona maintained their winning start to the season with a fine strike from Adriano Correia giving them a 1-0 victory over Valencia in La Liga action on Sunday.The Catalan side may have lost the domestic Super Cup to Real Madrid in midweek but they have now picked up maximum points from their first three league games that keeps them top of the table.last_img read more

KPL clubs receive Sh7.5m annual grant boost

first_imgThe increment comes courtesy of the SuperSport broadcast rights deal and Tusker naming rights partnership with KPL.In total, KPL will disburse Sh120m (USD 1,307,923) to the clubs this season compared to Sh112 m (USD 1,220,728) last season.The winner of the league title will earn a prize money of Sh4.5m (USD 49,047) up from the previous Sh4m (43,597), runner-ups will receive Sh2m (USD 21,799), while Sh1.5m (USD 16,349) with go towards third finisher as fourth team pockets Sh1m (USD 10,899).Clubs are also entitled to grants by final rank in amounts according to how the teams are placed at the final league table with the top finisher getting the most and the basement side the least.The top ranked team will receive Sh705, 920, second ranked will take home Sh661, 800 while third team will earn Sh617, 680.This means the 2015 KPL champions will pocket a whopping total amount of Sh12.2 m (USD 132,972) from the league body.The match officials officiating fees has been budgeted for Sh11.9m (USD129, 702) up from last year’s Sh10.9m (USD 118,803) that is an increase of 15 per cent both on the match fees and the travel allowances.KPL grants per club over the years:2008: Sh1.4 million2009: Sh2.1 million2010: Sh2.6 million2011: Sh4 million2012: Sh5.6 million2013: Sh6.5 million2014: Sh7 million2015: Sh7.5 million-material used to compile story from KPL official website-0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000NAIROBI, Kenya, March 25 –Kenyan Premier League (KPL) has announced a 7.14 percent annual grant increment to clubs participating in the league.In a statement published by KPL official website, by the end of this season the 16 clubs participating in the top tier league will have received grants of Sh7.5m (USD 81,745) each from the league body.last_img read more

Gus Poyet says referees ‘must do better’ after controversial Wes Brown dismissal

first_imgSunderland manager Gus Poyet has called for more honesty amongst referees after Wes Brown was mistakenly dismissed in the Black Cats’ 2-0 defeat to Manchester United.Brown was shown a straight red card at Old Trafford for supposedly hauling down Radamel Falcao in the penalty area, when it looked as though teammate John O’Shea actually committed the offence.O’Shea admitted to referee Roger East that he was the guilty party but it was Brown who was given his marching orders, with Poyet admitting Sunderland will review the decision in the coming days.“I think we need to analyse the action and report from the referee properly. We need to be fair with the players and with everything on the table we will make a decision,” said Poyet.“They have to do better though, then we can talk about whether it was the right or wrong decision. I think they need to be more honest.”Poyet felt particularly aggrieved after another controversial decision condemned his side to a defeat against a sluggish United side who were there for the taking when the score was 0-0.He added: “There’s too many every day, every weekend.“Tomorrow, for example, is a big final and one decision could change the game. That is something we cannot hide.”Poyet also admitted he was guilty of a managerial misjudgement which contributed to the defeat which leaves his side with just one win in their last ten league matches.“I didn’t change early enough to stop that penalty happening and that was my decision so I have to accept some of the responsibility,” said Poyet.last_img read more

Ex-Man City star Mario Balotelli close to agreeing shock move to European giants

first_imgMario Balotelli is closing in on a sensational move to Juventus at the end of the season, according to reports.The striker is currently plying his trade in France with Nice, where he has scored 17 goals in Ligue 1 already.The Serie A giants have a penchant for snapping up big players on free transfers, with a deal for Emre Can also mooted.However, according to The Sun, they have now turned their attention to the controversial ex-Manchester City star.Balotelli’s agent Mino Raiola boats an impressive clientele already, and his relationship with the Old Lady could be key to the deal.A five-year deal has reportedly been drawn up, which includes a hefty signing-on bonus when the Italian eventually signs in July later this year.It is understood the 27-year-old would be a key player alongside Gonzalo Higuain, rather than as his back up.Although the fiery striker has already represented both Milan clubs in his early career, it is understood the Juventus hierarchy are under no illusions about his quality.You can read the full story from The Sun here. Balotelli has been prolific in Ligue 1 for Nice 1last_img read more

Foster care changes the lives of SCV family

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – It’s difficult to imagine Christine Hart without her children – her white, nine-seat SUV is constantly filled with the laughter and chatter of her five kids. “Everyone who knows me knows my children come first,” Hart said, as she gazed upon her little ones. On a recent trip to Santa Clarita Central Park, each of the little Harts ran off to play with their their dad but make frequent trips back to Mom in search of water, Band-aids or even just a hug. Hart was in her element. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’Not too long ago, this kind of life was but a dream for Hart and her husband, Lance. Doctors found she had an undeveloped uterus and would never have children. “I kept thinking, Why me?” Hart said. But a chance meeting gave the couple a shot at parenthood and the chance to adopt five children and foster dozens more. Hart, looking to take her mind off the kids she so badly wanted, joined a local gym years ago. She met a woman there who changed her life. “I saw this woman at the pool, she had five children, all different ethnicities, and they were all calling her Mom,” Hart said. Hart couldn’t contain her curiosity, and a few moments later the woman was telling her about foster care. Hart had accepted she couldn’t have children, so she figured caring for someone else’s temporarily, could fill her void. Growing up in a traditional Filipino family, Hart was always around children. The eldest of five, she helped raise younger brothers and sisters. She even took in and eventually adopted a godson, whom she still visits at least once a year in the Philippines. Her new friend referred her to a private agency where on her first visit she was handed two photo albums – one pink and one blue – filled with young boys and girls in need of homes. Hart still has trouble understanding how thousands of abandoned and abused boys and girls in the foster-care system can be relegated to color coordinated photo albums. “I could not believe how these parents, who were given the blessing of having children, would waste their lives,” Hart said, tears rolling down her face. The Harts realized they wanted to give some of these children homes – permanently. But like many other prospective parents, they had some conditions. They wanted younger children, no older than 5, to rear and mold. They also wanted either Filipino or white kids, like Hart and her husband of 15 years. Those chances were slim and so the couple agreed to provide foster care to all types of children, then adopt when they found their match. “Are you sitting down?” the social worker asked Hart. The date was Dec. 5, 1996. There was a baby for the Harts, her name was Alexandra. She was three-quarters Filipino and only 5 months old. Today Alexandra couldn’t bear more resemblance to her adoptive mother. When she’s asked who she looks like she promptly answers “my mom.” Foster children continued to pass through the Harts’ home. At least 30 children, they said. Some of the children they wanted to adopt went back to their biological families. Reunification is always the goal in foster care. But letting go wasn’t always easy. “Sometimes even packing their bags was too much for me,” Hart said. A couple of years passed, and one day Hart received a 4-month-old little girl. Dark hair and dark eyes, little Olivia had no family willing to care for her. Before the Harts finalized her adoption, they learned Olivia had a little brother, Michael. When siblings are in foster care, the goal is to place them in the same home, but you need a willing parent. And the Harts definitely were willing. Now the Harts had three children, plus the adoptive son in the Philippines. Their babies grew quickly and the Harts no longer took in foster children. They had their family. Two years later Hart received another call. Olivia and Michael had another sister. She had been placed in a home before the agency realized that her siblings were with the Harts. The foster family wanted to adopt her but the Harts had priority. One look at little Ashley closed the deal for the Harts. The family moved to a larger house. They replenished the supply of baby items as many had been given to friends. And still another call, this time it was from a hospital where the children’s birth mother had had another baby. Still pink, the tiny baby was abandoned by his mother after she gave birth to him six weeks early. “He was a John Doe,” Hart said with tears welling up in her eyes. “He was the size of my arm and I could not let him go.” Christopher, or “Baby” as he is more often called, completed the family. Hart has contact with the birth mother of the four children. She said she’s begged her to consider permanent birth control, which she would pay for. But she would never turn another baby away. “How would my children feel if they knew there was another sibling that they had that I didn’t take?” Still the family has its challenges. The children all are asthmatic, a common consequence of exposure to drugs before birth. Three of the five children have been diagnosed with learning disorders. But the family is tightly knit, traveling the world – to Hong Kong, Japan, Mexico, and the Philippines. Hart has lunch with her school-age children every day. The couple spends the extra money for Catholic school minutes from Hart’s job. Things, she said, have worked out. “I tell my children, you didn’t come from my tummy but you came from my heart. You are the chosen ones.” connie.llanos@dailynews.com (661)257-5254160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

What caused this employee to claim disability discrimination on her second day of work?

first_imgWhen was the last time that you trained your managers and supervisors on how to address disability accommodation requests? Or, how about the last time that you reminded your supervisors and managers that an employee with a disability needs to be treated respectfully?If it’s been a while (or, maybe, I dunno, forever), have I got a case for you!Yes, Boudreau v. Bethesda Foundation of Nebraska is your wake-up call.Oh, you have an anxiety disorder? ***Shakes elevator***Carly Boudreau was hired for a housekeeping position. Prior to her hire, Ms. Boudreau did not disclose that she had Tourette’s Syndrome and anxiety disorder.On her first day of work, Bethesda Foundation assigned Ms. Boudreau to work with a lead housekeeper for training. To say it didn’t start off well would be an understatement. Allegedly, upon learning that Ms. Boudreau had a disability, the lead housekeeper told her that her disability was “all in her head” that she should “get off pills” and that the lead housekeeper would “fix” her.It gets worse.Ms. Boudreau also claimed that when she disclosed that her Tourette’s Syndrome, the lead housekeeper asked questions like “Does that mean you say ‘shit’ and ‘asshole’ all the time?” And, after learning of the anxiety disorder, the lead housekeeper jumped up and down in the elevator to make it shake. Thus, it should come as no surprise that the lead housekeeper supposedly denied Ms. Boudreau’s requests for more direction regarding her work duties and expectations.A policy not worth the paper it’s printed on.To its credit, Bethesda Foundation had a disability-accommodation policy. Any employee with a disability could request a reasonable accommodation from a supervisor or Executive Director of Resources. Unfortunately for Ms. Boudreau, when she tried to reach the housekeeping supervisor on her second day of work, he was out of the office. So, Ms. Boudreau bolted!Subsequently, Ms. Boudreau’s mom contacted the housekeeping supervisor to request an accommodation on her daughter’s behalf. Namely, she wanted the lead housekeeper to be less of a ghoul.Sounds reasonable to me. Even the housekeeping supervisor conceded that the lead housekeeper could be “gruff.” So, he told mom to tell her daughter to “sit tight until I get back on Friday.” So, naturally, Carly Boudreau sat tight, did not return to work, and called the housekeeping supervisor on Friday to discuss her work situation and next steps. Except, when the housekeeping supervisor answered her call, she claims that he immediately informed her that she was terminated for her unauthorized departure from work.You can guess how this one turned out…Yep, we’re going to trial.The first element of a failure to accommodate claim is whether an employee put her employer on notice of her disability and the need for an accommodation. Did that happen here? Probably.In her deposition, Plaintiff’s mother relates her telephone conversation with Al Austin. She described to Mr. Austin “an interactive problem” between Plaintiff and the employee conducting her training and explicitly referenced her daughter’s “disability.” Specifically, she characterized her daughter as “something like high-functioning autistic.” She also indicated that anyone training Plaintiff would need to work slowly and use appropriate descriptors.And what about the defendant’s argument that it had no duty to accommodate because the plaintiff quit? For god’s sake…Plaintiff has alleged facts suggesting Defendant responded to the initiation of an interactive process by terminating its employee, a move clearly at odds with an employer’s duty to engage the interactive process in good faith.Don’t let this happen in your workplace.Make sure that your anti-harassment policy and respect-in-the-workplace training address treatment of employees with disabilities.Have a disability-accommodation policy.And train your supervisors and managers how to address disability-accommodation requests. Originally posted on Employer Handbook Blog.last_img read more

Oklahoma ~ Corporate Income Tax: Taxpayer’s Sale of Assets in Pass-Through Entities Qualified for Capital Gains Deduction

first_imgA corporate income taxpayer’s sale of assets held in two S corporations (pass-through entities) qualified for the Oklahoma net capital gains deduction because the transaction amounted to the sale of an indirect ownership interest. Under the applicable statute, a sale of a “direct or indirect ownership interest” in an Oklahoma company will qualify for a net capital gains deduction if the taxpayer that makes the sale has held the stock or ownership interest in the company for at least two years prior to the date of the transaction from which the capital gains arise. In this case, the taxpayer received his proportionate share of the proceeds from the sale of the assets and reported the sum as a net capital gains on his federal individual income tax return and sought an equivalent deduction on an amended Oklahoma return. However, the Oklahoma Tax Commission (Commission) disallowed the deduction to the extent the proceeds were derived from intangible personal property (goodwill), on the grounds that the applicable statute did not allow for that deduction. However, the commission’s reasoning was rejected as the applicable statute provided capital gains deduction from selling”indirect ownership interest” in an Oklahoma pass-through entity including proceeds derived from intangible personal property (goodwill). Further, the taxpayer’s argument that the applicable statute, prior to a 2007 amendment, intended to afford a deduction for net capital gains arising from the sale of an Oklahoma company’s assets including goodwill, was affirmed. Accordingly, the commission’s denial of the net capital gain deduction was reversed.Bill Hare, Jr. v. Oklahoma Tax Commission, Oklahoma Supreme Court, No. 114893, June 27, 2017, ¶201-234Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Roundup 12/14: Green Eyeshade Edition

first_imgAs they struggle with declining revenues and a shift to digital technology, newspapers are shedding bureaus and talented staff. Today The New York Times confirmed that a respected science and environment reporter, Andrew Revkin, will be leaving after taking a buyout, according to Cristine Russell of Columbia Journalism Review. Revkin, who plans to launch a project at the Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies in New York state, will continue to edit his popular blog Dot Earth.Money troubles continue to roil California’s universities. Two unions representing more than 15,000 research employees at the University of California will picket tomorrow to protest pay cuts handed down by UC administrators despite rising income from federal research grants. Meanwhile, UC San Francisco (UCSF) has agreed to a second independent audit due to a letter from Senator Charles Grassley (R–IA). UCSF has been in a dispute with ousted medical school dean, David Kessler, over alleged financial irregularities.  Maryland has the highest U.S. concentration of STEM workers (science, technology, engingeering, and mathematics)—4.7% of the population—according to a new state-by-state analysis released today by the Commission of Professionals on Science and Technology in Washington, D.C. Mississippi has the lowest, with 1.3%.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)As he promised earlier this month, NIH Director Francis Collins has quickly agreed to the addition of 27 more human embryonic stem cell lines to the NIH registry, bringing to 40 the total available to federally-funded researchers.last_img read more

Knighthood in hand, astrophysicist prepares to lead U.S. fusion lab

first_img By Daniel CleryJun. 19, 2018 , 2:20 PM Knighthood in hand, astrophysicist prepares to lead U.S. fusion lab Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Steven Cowleycenter_img “We have to push down the cost and scale of fusion reactors,” Cowley told ScienceInsider shortly after the 16 May announcement of his PPPL appointment. “I fully support ITER because we have to do a burning plasma. But commercial reactors will need to be smaller and cheaper. A JET-sized machine would be so much more appealing. MAST and NSTX will be a dynamic team going forward.”Despite the good food and well-stocked cellar on the Corpus Christi campus, Cowley says he is eager to return to the cut and thrust of laboratory life. “It’s too much fun. I was really feeling I missed the everyday discussions about physics and what was going on. I’m a fusion nut. We’re going to crack it one of these days and I want to be part of it,” he says. And PPPL, he adds, will be central to that effort. “Princeton is the place where much of what we know now was figured out. It’s a legendary lab in plasma physics. It’ll be fun to go and work with these people.”His first job there will be to get the NSTX back on track. “I’m confident we can solve this problem. They’ve understood how the faults arose and they’ve understood how to fix them. If the money comes through, we will get NSTX back online,” he says.Cowley says the key goal for spherical tokamaks and other variants is to reduce turbulent transport, the process that allows swirling plasma to move heat from the core of the device to the edge where it can escape. If designers can figure out how to retain the heat more effectively, the reactor doesn’t need to be so large. Spherical tokamaks do this by seeking to hold the plasma in the center of the device, close to the central column.Another way to solve the heat problem is to increase a device’s magnetic field strength overall by using superconducting magnets, an approach being followed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. “That can push the scale down,” Cowley says, “but high field is not enough on its own. If there is a disruption [a sudden loss of confinement], that can be very damaging” to the machine.Cowley thinks future machines may take elements from more then one type of reactor—including stellarators, a reactor type that has a doughnut shape that is similar to tokamaks, but with bizarrely twisted magnets that can confine plasma without needing the flow of current around the loop that tokamaks rely on. “There are beautiful ideas coming from the stellarators community,” he says. Wendelstein 7-X, a “phenomenal” new stellarator in Germany, has been a major driver, he says.What has changed dramatically in the past couple of decades has been “the ability to calculate what’s going on,” Cowley says. Advances in both theory and computing power means “we have all these new ideas and can explore the spaces in silicon. The field is driven more by science and less by intuition,” he says. “It’s quite a revolution.”Meanwhile, ITER construction trundles on despite numerous delays and price hikes. Cowley acknowledges that things have improved since the current director, Bernard Bigot, took over. “Bigot is an extremely good leader. He’s steadied the ship; he makes decisions,” Cowley says. “And they’ve got their team. It took time to find the right set of people.” Building ITER is “an amazingly tough thing to do. Assembly [of the tokamak] will be quite challenging and hard to stay on schedule. But when it is finished it will be a technological wonder.”But perhaps the biggest obstacle to progress is a shortage of funding, which has been stagnant in the United States for many years. President Donald Trump has requested $340 million for DOE’s fusion research programs in the 2019 fiscal year that begins 1 October, a 36% cut from current levels, but Congress is unlikely to approve that cut. “There’s real hope [the 2019 budget] will move up, but it’s not energizing the field,” Cowley says. “If we can get NSTX to produce spectacular physics results—on a par with the performance of JET—we will energize the community with science.” It’s been quite a few weeks for Steven Cowley, the British astrophysicist who formerly headed the United Kingdom’s Culham Centre for Fusion Energy (CCFE). Last month, he was named as the new director of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) in New Jersey, the United States’s premier fusion research lab. Then, last week he received a knighthood from the United Kingdom’s Queen Elizabeth II “for services to science and the development of nuclear fusion.”Cowley, or Sir Steven, is now president of Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. He will take over his PPPL role on 1 July. He has a long track record in fusion research, having served as head of CCFE from 2008 to 2016 and as a staff scientist at PPPL from 1987 to 1993. PPPL is a Department of Energy (DOE)-funded national laboratory with a staff of more than 500 and an annual budget of $100 million. But in 2016, the lab took a knock when its main facility, the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), developed a series of disabling faults shortly after a $94 million upgrade. PPPL’s then-director, Stewart Prager, resigned soon after. DOE is now considering a recovery plan for the NSTX, which is expected to cost tens of millions of dollars.During Cowley’s tenure at CCFE, that lab also started an upgrade of its rival to the NSTX, the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). Spherical tokamaks are a variation on the traditional doughnut-shaped tokamak design whose ultimate expression, the giant ITER device in France, is now under construction. The plan is for ITER to demonstrate a burning plasma, one where the fusion reactions themselves generate all or most of the heat required to sustain the burn. But once that is done, researchers hope spherical tokamaks, or some other variation, will provide a route to commercial reactors that are smaller, simpler, and cheaper than ITER. By upgrading the NSTX and the MAST, the labs hope to show that this type of compact reactor can achieve the same sort of performance as CCFE’s Joint European Torus (JET), the world’s largest tokamak right now and the record holder on fusion performance.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more