JK Guv directs officers to take stock of situation

first_imgNew Delhi: A day after the Parliament adopted a resolution revoking the special status of J&K and passed a bill bifurcating the state into two union territories, J&K Governor Satya Pal Malik directed Deputy Commissioners of respective districts to take stock of requirements of the people. In a meeting at the Raj Bhavan, the governor was informed that emergency services in hospitals were functioning normally, people were seen in markets buying daily provisions and electricity and water supply was also satisfactory. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’A Raj Bhawan spokesperson also said if tourists and other people in Kashmir feel any kind of distress, they should contact the nearest police station or go to the magistrate of the area. Over 500 important political workers and leaders, including former chief ministers Omar Abdullah and Mehbooba Mufti, have been detained in Jammu and Kashmir since the Centre decided to revoke provisions of Article 370 and divide the state to two union territories, officials said. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KActivists across the political spectrum have been detained in Srinagar as well as other parts of the valley, they said. According to latest reports, about 560 such workers have been lodged in makeshift detention centres in Sher-e-Kashmir International Convention Centre in Srinagar and other such centres in Baramulla and Gurez. Former chief ministers Omar Abdullah of the National Conference and Mehbooba Mufti of the PDP have been detained at Hari Niwas on Gupkar road. However, the situation in all the three regions of Jammu and Kashmir was “comfortable”, PTI quoted officials as saying on Wednesday. Meanwhile, National Security Advisor (NSA) Ajit Doval on Wednesday undertook a whirlwind visit to the militancy-infested south Kashmir and assured the locals that their security is the government’s responsibility. Doval arrived in Kashmir on Tuesday, a day after the Centre revoked the provisions of Article 370, which gave special autonomous status to Jammu and Kashmir. He is reaching out to the local population in the Valley as a confidence building measure (CMB). “Everything will be alright. Your safety and security is our responsibility,” Doval told people in Shopian district. An unprecedented security cover and several restrictions are in place in Kashmir. All modes of communication have been snapped in the Valley. Doval was seen eating food on a footpath outside closed shops and talking to locals. He exchanged views with them on the security situation and the government’s decision to abrogate provisions of Article 370 and bifurcate Jammu and Kashmir into two Union territories. “Your children and their children will continue to live here. They will make their name in the world,” the NSA told people. After the government’s move, Poonch district witnessed protests and stone-pelting resulting in minor injuries to a police officer, PTI quoted officials as saying, while Kargil town observed a shutdown in protest against modifying Article 370. However, after an intense period —from the time the Jammu and Kashmir Reorganisation Bill was introduced to the time Parliament passed it— some shops had opened in Srinagar, PTI reported. The movement of people on the roads picked up despite restrictions, PTI quoted a senior official of the state administration as saying. The official also said that the authorities were extending assistance to people who had a marriage in the family, PTI reported.last_img read more

Liberals again delay firearm marking regulations despite campaign promise

first_imgOTTAWA – The Trudeau government is again delaying implementation of firearm-marking regulations intended to help police trace guns used in crimes — despite a 2015 campaign pledge to immediately enact them.The federal government announced Friday it will defer the regulations, which were slated to come into force early next month, until Dec. 1, 2020.It said more time is needed to come up with a system for implementing the regulations, first drafted in 2004, adding that details about the deferral would be made available later this month.The firearms community has long opposed the measure.The regulations would require domestically manufactured firearms to bear the name of the manufacturer, serial number, and “Canada” or “CA,” while imported guns would have to carry the “Canada” or “CA” designation along with the last two digits of the year of import.The measures would help Canada meet the requirements of the United Nations Firearms Protocol and a convention of the Organization of American States.Public Safety Canada has said the markings also have value for domestic and international law enforcement in tracing crime guns.In a statement Friday, the department said the government is continuing work “to develop an effective markings regime that enables law enforcement to effectively trace crime guns, without imposing undue constraints or costs on firearms owners and businesses.”The previous Conservative government delayed the regulations several times.In their election platform, the Liberals said they would “immediately” implement gun-marking regulations. In addition, the marking-regulation promise was included in a briefing book document prepared for the prime minister entitled “Key Commitments for Action in First 100 Days.”However, they missed a June 1, 2017, implementation date, bumping it to Dec. 1 of this year.At the time, officials said the effect of the Conservative government’s destruction of the long-gun registry would need to be considered before bringing the regulations into force.Some firearms advocates have argued the obligation to mark imported guns would mean acquiring marking technology or making arrangements for another company to apply markings, with an estimated cost of $200 per gun.However, an independent study commissioned by the government said the cost to stamp or engrave markings for Canadian manufacturers and large importers would range from nothing at all to $25 per firearm. It was not possible to gauge the impact on individuals and small importers.Many Canadian gun manufacturers exporting to the United States already mark their firearms in a manner that would meet or exceed requirements set out in the regulations to meet U.S. standards, and at least one importer has voluntarily applied import marks, according to an internal government memo.Regardless, the memo said, the majority of firearms advocates and businesses are “strongly opposed” to the regulations due to the perception they would saddle manufacturers and importers with additional costs while providing little public safety benefit.— Follow @JimBronskill on Twitterlast_img read more

UNbacked project to help thousands of rural poor in Azerbaijan

17 June 2008More than 22,000 poor households in north-western Azerbaijan are expected to benefit from a new United Nations-backed scheme to strengthen local irrigation systems, improve farming methods and widen access to rural finance. The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is providing a loan of $17 million to finance the project, worth over $32 million, under an agreement with the Azerbaijani Government.The project is focused on four districts in the northwest – Agstafa, Gazakh, Shamkir and Tovuz – according to a press statement released by IFAD today.IFAD’s country programme manager for Azerbaijan, Abdallah Rahman, said the project aims to boost the production, productivity and competitiveness of smallholders.“The project will enhance the capability and self-reliance of communities to look after their own affairs and plan and implement their own development initiatives more effectively,” Mr. Rahman said.Households in north-western Azerbaijan depend heavily on irrigated agriculture but the irrigation systems are currently in decline because of lack of maintenance, neglect and a shortage of funds.The project will rehabilitate the dilapidated infrastructure and will also help farmers involved in both crops and livestock diversify their incomes and have greater access to finance. read more

Another 30 Sri Lankan refugees to return from Tamil Nadu

The UNHCR provides free air tickets, reintegration allowance of US$ 75 per person, transport allowance US$ 19 per person and monitory non-food grant of US$ 75 per family.Since 2011, already 5110 refugees (1863 Families) have returned to Sri Lanka said the Ministry Secretary V.Sivagnanasothy. Over 64,000 are stationed in 109 welfare camps in India. The Minister of Prison Reforms, Rehabilitation, Resettlement and Hindu Religious Affairs D.M.Swaminathan had a discussion with the UNHCR and facilitated the process and increased the baggage allowance per person with assistance of the Ministry of Public Enterprise Development. Another 30 Sri Lankan Tamil refugees in Tamil Nadu, India will arrive in Sri Lanka under the UNHCR facilitated voluntary repatriation programme, the Ministry of Prison Reforms, Rehabilitation, Resettlement and Hindu Religious Affairs.The 30 refugees from 11 families are scheduled to arrive through Sri Lankan Airlines (MJ 308) next Tuesday from Madurai. V. Sivagnanasothy, Secretary, Ministry of Prison Reforms, Rehabilitation, Resettlement and Hindu Religious Affairs said that of the 30 refugee returnees 13 are males and 17 are females. These refugee returnees will get back to Mullaitivu, Vavuniya, Mannar and Trincomalee. Over 100,000 Sri Lankan refugees are currently in India.  Minister Swaminathan  initiated a Cabinet paper on which livelihood assistance of maximum Rs. 100,000 to refugee returnees is provided to support the livelihood activities.Further, the provision of dry ration has already been approved for 6 months. The REPPIA has been instructed by the Ministry of Prison Reforms, Rehabilitation, Resettlement and Hindu Religious Affairs to provide compensation for those who have lost their houses and suffered loss of lives family members and for injuries.Sivagnanasothy said that the refugees who lost their houses will be provided with houses under the housing programme of the Ministry. The Government of Sri Lanka under the leadership of President Maithripala Sirisena has initiated action to encourage the voluntary refugee returnee programme on a phased out basis and the Government says the current trend of increased refugee returnees is a sign of reconciliation and moving towards permanent peace. (Colombo Gazette) read more

TSX begins another week on down note oil and loonie also lose

TSX begins another week on down note, oil and loonie also lose ground by Peter Henderson, The Canadian Press Posted Jan 18, 2016 6:21 am MDT Last Updated Jan 18, 2016 at 3:20 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – The Toronto Stock Exchange failed to break out of its post-Christmas slump Monday, posting a triple-digit loss that brought the index down to levels last seen two and a half years ago.The S&P/TSX composite index ended the day down 131.29 points at 11,942.17, continuing a three-week slide that has stripped it of almost 1,400 points or more than 10 per cent of its value.Craig Fehr, Canadian market strategist at Edward Jones in St. Louis, said the slide on the Canadian market has continued because of an absence of any good news on the markets.“It looks like the path of least resistance is down for the market in the very near term,” he said.The last time the TSX closed below 12,000 points was in June 2013. The index is now down almost 23 per cent from its all-time high close of 15,657.63 set on Sept. 3, 2014.American markets were closed Monday for the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday after having started the new year with their worst ever opening two-week period.Both the Dow Jones industrial average and the broader S&P 500 index have fallen by more than 8.5 per cent since the Christmas break, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq has fallen by nearly 11 per cent.“It’s clear that a wave of pessimism has really started to set in for the equity markets,” Fehr said.Because of the holiday, commodity contracts did not settle. In late-day trading, February crude oil was down 48 cents at US$28.94 a barrel, a new 12-year low.On Saturday, the United States and other world powers formally lifted international sanctions against Iran after that country suspended its nuclear program.Iran, which has been prevented from fully participating in world oil markets, has said it plans to increase production by 500,000 barrels per day now that sanctions have been lifted.The commodity-sensitive Canadian dollar fell 0.12 of a U.S. cent to settle at 68.70 cents US.Fehr said the loonie has probably found an equilibrium between 65 and 70 cents US, as the price of oil nears a bottom.He said markets have been ignoring the positive signs from the American economy as the focus has shifted to oil and the underperformance of China, where stock-market volatility and a faltering economy have dampened the outlook.“If the U.S. is going to regain some momentum, gain some footing, a low loonie really is going to benefit the (Canadian) economy in terms of exports and we’ve seen flashes of that in the last several months,” he said.In other commodities, February natural gas added 2.4 cents to US$2.124 per mmBtu, while February gold lost US$1.80 to US$1,088.90 a troy ounce.Note to readers: This is a corrected story: A previous incorrectly said the last previous close below 12,000 was in 2012 read more

Latin American nations voice concerns to Ban over rerouting of Bolivian leaders

During the meeting between Mr. Ban and the ambassadors of Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, Nicaragua and Venezuela, which took place at UN Headquarters in New York, the Secretary-General said he understood the concerns which have been expressed about this unfortunate incident. He added that he was relieved it did not lead to consequences for the safety of Mr. Morales and his entourage, according to a readout issued by Mr. Ban’s spokesperson. The Secretary-General also said it was important to prevent such incidents from occurring in the future. A Head of State and his or her aircraft enjoy immunity and inviolability, he noted. On 2 July, the plane carrying Mr. Morales home from a summit in Russia was rerouted to Austria after several countries refused to allow it to fly over their airspace because of suspicions that Mr. Snowden – who is believed to be in the Moscow airport – was on board. A former US National Security Agency contractor who acknowledged giving journalists secret documents, Mr. Snowden has reportedly requested asylum from over a dozen countries, including Bolivia. Mr. Ban expressed the hope in today’s meeting that all of the concerned Governments will discuss the concerns amicably and in good faith, with full respect for all legitimate interests involved, and with a view to maintaining friendly relations among nations, said his spokesperson. read more

UN calls on Libyan political stakeholders to redouble efforts to reach agreement

Libya has been plagued by factional fighting since the 2011 revolution, with the situation continuing to deteriorate in recent months amid significant political fragmentation and violence. Following broad consultations facilitated by the Secretary-General’s Special Representative and head of UNSMIL, Bernardino León, it was announced in mid-October that a national unity government could be proposed.In a statement issued today, the Mission recalled that immediately after the conclusion of the dialogue, it transmitted the Libyan Political Agreement to the main stakeholders for their endorsement. “Following this, the Mission has undertaken extensive consultations with parties across the Libyan political spectrum on ways of addressing some of the concerns with respect to the configuration of the Presidency Council, especially those related to fair and adequate representation for the east, more specifically Benghazi,” the statement noted.“These are primarily focused on the need for a formula that safeguards Libya’s historical traditions of geographical and regional balance and representation,” it continued.Meanwhile, UNSMIL also underlined that all parties were in consensus regarding the legitimacy of these demands, and the need to expand the configuration of the Presidency Council from six to nine, to include the Prime Minister, five Deputy Prime Ministers, and three senior ministers.“While underscoring the need to reflect this newly proposed revision of the Presidency Council in the text of the Libyan Political Agreement, all parties recognised that the successful implementation of this reconfiguration would require an increased level of cooperation and partnership among members of the Presidency Council, mainly between the Prime Minister and his deputies, but also including the larger group forming the Presidency Council,” the statement explained.According to UNSMIL, parties also stressed that this would inevitably need to be reflected in provisions governing the decision-making process in the Presidency Council. read more

Mens Hockey No 5 Ohio States 7game home win streak snapped with

Red Shirt junior goalie Sean Romeo (30) dives for a save in the shutout against Michigan tonight Jan. 26, 2018 at the Schottenstein Center in Columbus, OH. Credit: Ethan Clewell | For The LanternSpecial teams could not save the No. 5 Ohio State men’s hockey team (18-6-4, 11-6-1-0) in a 6-3 loss to an aggressive and balanced Michigan State (10-17-1, 4-13-1-1). Saturday night’s loss snapped a seven-game home winning streak and split the weekend series at the Schottenstein Center.Ohio State’s special teams went 3-for-5 on the power play and a perfect 4-for-4 on the penalty kill, but the Buckeyes’ 5-on-5 play struggled against the Spartan defense.“That’s the difference. You look at the stat sheet here, when you win the special teams’ battle, you’re gonna win that game most of the time,” Ohio State head coach Steve Rohlik said. “That tells you how bad we were defensively, and it tells you how good Michigan State was.”  The Spartans came out flying, potting two goals in the game’s opening 10 minutes.Michigan State sophomore defenseman Butrus Ghafari feathered a wrister from center point through traffic to get past redshirt junior goalie Sean Romeo.Then Spartan freshman forward Austin Kamer gathered the puck along the half-wall and threw a simple shot on goal past the glove hand of Romeo.Throughout the first period, Michigan State pinned the Buckeyes in their own zone using its aggressive forecheck. The Buckeyes had a chance late in the period on the power play, but that aggressive Spartan forecheck took the puck from behind Romeo, resulting in a short-handed goal off the stick of sophomore forward Patrick Khodorenko to stretch the Michigan State lead to three goals.“They came out and worked extremely hard like they do, we knew that was coming,” Rohlik said. “We just made some untimely mistakes, again you can’t give good teams like that and spot them a lead like that.”  The Buckeyes totaled 30 shots on goal, but it could’ve been more with the Spartans getting in front of the shooting lanes, frustrating shooters for the Buckeyes.“We know they always put their body on the line,” senior forward Matthew Weis said. “Like coach [Rohlik] said, they are a good team. We just didn’t play our best tonight.”   Midway through the second period, Michigan State freshman forward David Keefer took the puck across the crease and appeared to roof it over a sprawling Romeo for his second goal of the season.Confusion surrounded whether the puck crossed the goal line, which led to a lengthy review that eventually confirmed Keefer’s goal. Rohlik was appalled by the officials’ indecision.“I really don’t even know what to say anymore, to be honest with you,” Rohlik said. “We’ve got video replay to have someone make a call, not say, ‘Well, we’re not sure.’”    The Michigan State attack continued with a goal from senior defenseman Carson Gratt to give his team a 5-1 lead, which ended Romeo’s night. Romeo finished the game with 12 saves on 17 shots. Freshman goalie Tommy Napier took over for Ohio State and made all six saves.The Buckeyes could not seem to get out of their own way, handling the puck poorly, and it cost them three points in the Big Ten standings.“The problem tonight was we had some momentum going, all of the sudden, there was a breakdown the other way,” Rohlik said. “Next thing you know, they’ve got a guy behind our ‘D’ and walking in on the goaltending. We just had too many defensive breakdowns tonight for our team.”   Next week, the Buckeyes will travel to face No. 2 Notre Dame for a crucial Big Ten weekend series. The puck will drop at 7:35 p.m. Friday and 7 p.m. Saturday. Both games will be played at the Compton Family Ice Arena. read more

Presumed consent for organ donation will save up to 700 lives a

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The announcement follows a consultation earlier this year, in which the Government sought views from members of the public about organ donation, receiving an unprecedented 17,000 responses.  The new consent model will allow individuals to record “religious faith needs” on the NHS Organ Donor Register.From this December, the register will allow them to state that their family or faith leaders should be involved in discussions to ensure that religious traditions are respected.  For some faiths, this would mean ensuring no delays in burial, so that any organ donation could only take place within such constraints. For others it could ensure final prayers are said at the time of death, in cases where donors are kept on life support until donation takes place.Officials said NHS staff would be given extra training, to ensure families were given time and access to a faith or spiritual leader, a imam or priest for example, who may want to come and be present to perform last rites ahead of the donation.Three people still die each day in need of an organ transplant – and currently there are 5,100 people in England on the waiting list.Research shows that 82 per cent of people in this country support organ donation, but only 37 per cent have recorded their wishes on the NHS Organ Donor Register.Currently, less than half of families give consent for their loved one’s organs to be donated if they are unaware of their wishes.Specialist nurses will always discuss donation with families ahead of any donation, officials said.Organ donation is only possible in around 1 per cent of  deaths and the number of people waiting for a suitable organ far outstrips the number donated organs available. Jackie Doyle-Price, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Mental Health and Inequalities said: “Organ donation saves lives. We believe that by making these changes, we can save as many as 700 more lives every year.   “But organ donation remains a gift. I want to encourage people who wish to give life in the event of their death to take the time to record their wishes and discuss it with their family.“However, we know this new system alone is not a magic bullet. We need to address myths and misconceptions around donation, and we will only do this by having informed debate and dialogue, which I hope will be fostered by these proposals.” It’s still really important for all of us to have conversations with our loved ones about organ donation so our wishes can be met if the worst should happenSimon Gillespie, British Heart Foundation Fiona Loud, Policy Director at Kidney Care UK, said:  “For the 25,000 patients on dialysis in England this means hope and a new future. Patients are dying every day while they wait for a transplant, so we welcome the commitment to change our system so more lives can be transformed. We believe the soft opt-out is the right thing to do, but it is not the only thing to do. The change in the law must be accompanied by a comprehensive awareness and education programme and we need to ensure there is capacity across the NHS so that these precious organs are not wasted.”Simon Gillespie, Chief Executive of the British Heart Foundation, said: “There is a desperate shortage of organ donors in the UK. Introducing an opt-out system in England will better reflect the views of the general public and give hope to those currently waiting for a transplant they so desperately need. This will also ease the agonising pain felt by many families who risk losing a loved one while they wait for an organ.“It’s still really important for all of us to have conversations with our loved ones about organ donation so our wishes can be met if the worst should happen.”Under the proposals, children under 18, individuals who lack the mental capacity to understand the changes and people who have not lived in England for at least 12 months before their death will be excluded from the plans. A new system of presumed consent for organ donation will save up to 700 lives a year, ministers have said.The Government today confirmed its intention to change the rules in spring 2020, introducing an “opt-out” model after decades of debate.Individuals will be able to record their preferences on a new NHS app launched later this year or via a helpline and website.For the first time, the register will also include an option for individuals to state religious and cultural beliefs – such as the need to avoid burial delays, or to ensure last rites can be performed.The changes will be called Max’s Law, after 10-year-old Max Johnson, whose family campaigned for changes after his life was saved by a heart transplant.The legislation, which was introduced in Parliament last July, is expected to return to the House of Commons in the autumn, having won widespread political backing so far.Ministers today called on as many people as possible to register their decision, whether it’s a yes or no to organ donation. read more

Venezuela coup Alarm grows as court takes power

Venezuelan opposition deputy Amelia Belisario argues with national guard outside the Supreme Court in Caracas(BBC) There have been demonstrations in Venezuela after the Supreme Court took over legislative powers from the National Assembly.Critics say the development takes the country closer to one-man rule under President Nicolas Maduro.The Organisation of American States (OAS) described the move as the “final blow to democracy in the country”.The ruling effectively dissolves the elected legislature which has been dominated by the president’s opponents.The secretary general of the OAS, Luis Almagro, described the move as a “self-inflicted coup” by Mr Maduro’s government.It comes after months of consolidation of power by the country’s president, who is locked in a political struggle with the centre-right opposition.The president’s supporters took part in a demonstration on Tuesday against the OAS (AFP/Getty Images)What has happened?On Thursday the Venezuelan Supreme Court seized power from the opposition-led legislature, a move that could essentially allow it to write laws itself.The court justified the move by saying the National Assembly’s lawmakers were “in a situation of contempt” after allegations of electoral irregularities by three opposition lawmakers during the 2015 elections.It did not indicate if or when it might hand power back.The court had previously backed the leftist president in his struggles with the legislature – on Tuesday removing parliamentary immunity from the Assembly’s members.The move is the latest example of the socialist President Maduro tightening his grip on power, which critics say he has been doing for months, amid a deepening economic crisis in the country.The National Assembly’s lawmakers were pictured scuffling with members of the National Guard while protesting outside the court on Thursday.The Speaker of Venezuela’s National Assembly, Julio Borges, addressed the media outside the legislative palace in Caracas.He urged the army, which has so far supported the president, to take a stand against him.In a tweet, jailed opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez called on people to take to the streets in order to “reject dictatorship and rescue democracy”.The Assembly’s Speaker, Julio Borges, tore up a copy of the judgement by the Supreme Court (AFP/Getty Images)What has the reaction been?The crisis has raised international alarm about the stability of Venezuelan demo, which has undergone three attempted military coups since 1992.The US state department called the court’s move “a serious setback for democracy.”Most regional powers including Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Peru and Chile have warned that the action is a threat to Venezuelan democracy.Leftist-led Bolivia defended President Maduro, who has yet to comment publicly.Venezuela’s foreign ministry accused critics of the government of forming a right-wing regional pact against President Maduro.Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez described the OAS is a pawn of US “imperialism”.A student protesting against President Maduro on a protest on Caracas’s main highway (AFP/Getty Images)Why is Venezuela in crisis?Tensions have been high in Venezuela because the country has been engulfed by a severe economic crisis.It has the world’s highest inflation rate, and the International Monetary Fund predicts it could reach 1,660% next year.The government and opposition blame each other for the country’s economic problems.President Maduro has become increasingly unpopular, and the opposition has called for his removal from office and fresh elections.President Maduro has attended pro-government rallies including this one on March 9th “against imperialism” (EPA Image) Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)RelatedOAS chief denounces ‘coup’ in VenezuelaMarch 30, 2017In “latest news”Venezuela National Assembly: ‘Government staged coup’October 24, 2016In “latest news”Venezuela: Supreme court backtracks on powers bidApril 1, 2017In “Regional” read more

OBITUARY Edward J Hayes 80

first_imgNORTH ANDOVER, MA — Edward J. Hayes, 80, a long time resident of North Andover, Mass., and Seabrook Beach, NH died at Massachusetts General Hospital on Saturday, April 14, 2018.Hayes was born in Lawrence, Mass., the son of the late George E Hayes, former Lawrence City Treasurer and Alice Morrissey Hayes, and brother of the late Barbara A. Hayes. His survivors include his wife, Kathleen Twomey Hayes, his daughters Julie Hayes Bresnahan and her husband Jack of South Hadley, Mass., Rebecca Hayes and her husband, James A Pappas, Jr., of South Boston, Mass., and Ellen Hayes and her husband, Anuj Ralhan, of San Francisco, California: his grandchildren, Theodore Arthur Pappas, and Anna Hayes Ralhan, three step grandsons, Dan, Scott, and TJ Bresnahan: dear sister and brother-in-law Anne Twomey Hubbard and Kenneth W. Hubbard: a niece Kristen Hubbard Artínano and her husband Javier: grand niece Sarah and, grand nephew Max: sister-in-law, Marylee Houle Twomey: two nephews, Duffy Twomey and his wife Kate Van Orden, and Michael L. Twomey: dear cousin Maryann J. Barraclough, and many wonderful friends.A Lawrence native and longtime resident of North Andover, and parishioner of St. Michael’s Parish, Ed was born on December 25, 1937. Educated in the Lawrence Public Schools, graduated Great Distinction from Lawrence High with the class of 1955, a Perkins Prize recipient, Sports Editor of the Lawrencian, and always spoke of his four years at Lawrence High School with great fondness and appreciation. He was an alumnus of Boston College with the class of 1959. Ed served in the U.S. Army Reserves for six years and began his insurance career with Liberty Mutual in Andover, Mass. as a Claims Adjuster, and then moved to business sales in Boston. He held the position of Business Sales Manager in Lexington, and then joined the Cornelius J. McCarthy Insurance Agency in Wilmington, Mass. and retired as a Vice President in Business Sales. Ed was a Eucharist Minister at St. Michael’s Parish, a communicant at St. Elizabeth’s Church at Seabrook Beach, and a parishioner at St. Ann’s Parish in Naples, Florida. He served as President of the Arbor Lakes Condominium Association at Naples Heritage Golf and Country Club, enjoying treasured friends and many rounds of golf. He participated in many of his children’s activities: serving as treasurer for Family Kindergarten in North Andover and volunteering at the Brooks Summer Tennis and Swim Club. He was a tennis partner to each of his daughters as they learned and played over the years at North Andover High School, Brooks, Cedardale, and Old Colony. He enjoyed his own singles matches with best friend and brother-in-law, Ken for over 20 years. Ed loved his home on Brentwood Circle, as well as Seabrook Beach and was grateful for all our dear friends for over 40 years. He loved jazz music, movies, Boston College Football, the Boston Bruins, the Red Sox, Patriots, and was a member of the Friends of Northeastern Hockey, the 2018 Beanpot Tournament Champions. The love of his life was Kathleen, married 54 years this July 2018. The joy of his life came to be his two beautiful grandchildren, Theo and Anna.Ed and his family are grateful for the care and kindness shown to him by the Hematology, Nursing, and Medical Staff at the Massachusetts General Hospital. May he Rest in Peace.Visiting Hours: In lieu flowers, the family suggests a donation in Ed’s name to: St. Vincent de Paul Society, St. Michael’s Parish, 196 Main Street, North Andover, MA 01845 Or St. Vincent de Paul Society, St. Elizabeth and Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Parish, 289 Lafayette Road, Hampton, NH 03842.Calling hours are on Thursday, April 19, 2018 from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM Conte Funeral Home, 17 Third Street, NORTH ANDOVER, MA. Funeral Mass will be on Friday April 20, 2018 at 10:00 AM St. Michael’s Church, 196 Main Street, North Andover, MA.Edward J. Hayes(NOTE: The above obituary is from Conte Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Maureen F. (McKenna) McHugh, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Dorothy Sylvia Lowry, 84In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Donald R. Donahue, 80In “Obituaries”last_img read more

11 Bangladeshi workers being quizzed over Sri Lanka attack link

first_img.Eleven Bangladeshi workers sent back by Sri Lanka are being interrogated by the law enforcement to find out if they had any link to one of Easter Sunday bombers, reports UNB.The workers arrived in Dhaka on Friday morning. They worked at a tobacco factory in Sri Lanka owned by militant leader Inshaf Ahmed Ibrahim, said Monirul Islam, chief of police’s Counter-terrorism and Transnational Crime Unit.Ibrahim died in a suicide attack at Sri Lanka’s Cinnamon Grand Colombo hotel, said Monirul.Inshaf and his brother Ilham Ahmed Ibrahim, 31, targeted the Shangri-La Hotel and the Cinnamon Grand Colombo hotel for two suicide bombings, according to Associated Press.More than 250 people were killed and hundreds injured in bomb attacks at luxury hotels and churches in the island nation. It is the worst violence the country has seen since its civil war ended a decade ago.Sri Lankan police shut down the factory after the attack and sent back all foreign workers to their respective countries, Monirul said. “We brought them (workers) from the airport for interrogation to learn what they know about their owner or if have any connection with him,” he added.After proper interrogation, a decision will be taken about the workers, he told reporters at CTTC’s headquarters on Saturday.last_img read more

NRA Rallies Members In Dallas Facing New Pressure And Anger

first_imgMike Stewart/APPresident Trump speaks to the National Rifle Association in 2017 in Atlanta. Despite new political pressure, the president and vice president are both scheduled to speak to the group this year.Tens of thousands of gun owners are gathering in Dallas for the National Rifle Association’s annual convention, as the group’s leadership rallies its rank-and-file in a political climate altered by the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., and the student protests that followed.The aftermath of the mass shooting, which cost 17 lives, makes this an important moment for the NRA. While its leaders remain insistent that more gun control will not stop such carnage, some acknowledge a shift in the way the country is talking about firearms.“Of course [Parkland] increased the probability in some states of legislators passing more meaningless legislation,” Tom King, an NRA board member from New York, tells NPR.“That’s going to happen, it already has happened. But has it eroded the NRA’s position? I don’t think so.”The three-day convention opens Thursday night, with President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence scheduled to be the key speakers on Friday — a sign of the NRA’s resilient power and influence. The convention features a series of forums and speakers on gun and safety issues and a huge exhibition hall with the latest weaponry.A big question in Dallas is how the NRA leadership navigates the less certain climate. Will it find new ways to tell its story to a country shaken by Parkland? Will there be a different conversation among rank-and-file gun owners about firearm safety?Protesters, including student activists, are expected to make their voices heard outside. A large rally in favor of gun control has been organized for Saturday morning at Dallas City Hall.King calls new gun control legislation “meaningless” because he’s convinced it won’t keep people or schools safe. But a growing number of people disagree, including some Republican leaders who have been closely aligned with the NRA.Among them is Florida’s Republican Gov. Rick Scott, who signed bipartisan gun legislation in the aftermath of the Parkland shooting that raised the age for gun purchases, while making it easier for law enforcement to take firearms from persons deemed a public risk. Scott and Florida’s Republican-controlled legislature defied the NRA to pass the measure.“The hardest thing I’ve ever had to do as a governor is try to find the words to console a parent who has lost their child,” Scott said at a signing ceremony in March.Vermont’s Republican Gov. Phil Scott also signed sweeping gun-control measures this spring and New York’s Republican-controlled Senate helped tighten that state’s already-strict gun laws. In all, at least seven states from Oregon to Rhode Island approved new gun legislation since the Parkland shooting, as have some municipalities.“I think that is a really important shift,” says Kris Brown, co-president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, a group that supports tighter gun laws.She believes the NRA lost ground after Parkland, fumbling control of the conversation, failing to adapt to a new national mood.“When we look at the last year with three of the deadliest mass shootings in American history, the NRA has been tone deaf,” she says.Brown points to surveys that have long shown most gun owners and many NRA members support creating a stronger system of background checks for gun buyers, one that closes loopholes for private sales. But she credits the Parkland students for redefining the gun debate.It was just a year ago that the NRA was so confident in its clout that the group had taken to mocking its political opponents, promising to crush anyone who proposed new gun laws.In a controversial video that went viral, spokeswoman Dana Loesch said the NRA would prevail by using “the clenched fist of truth.”Then came Parkland. In the days after the shooting, a new group of voices emerged in favor of gun control — student survivors who took on the NRA directly.“To every politician who is taking donations from the NRA, shame on you,” said Majorie Stoneman Douglas High School senior Emma Gonzalez at a rally shortly after the shooting. Her words drew a roar of applause and have been looped again and again on TV and social media.Even President Trump, a close NRA ally, publicly challenged the organization — at least for a rare moment.In a White House meeting with members of Congress two weeks after the Parkland shooting, he called for comprehensive new gun legislation and he accused lawmakers of being “afraid” of the NRA.“They do have great power, I agree with that,” Trump said. “They have great power over you people. They have less power over me.”But the NRA quickly flexed its political muscle. After a closed-door meeting with the group’s leaders, Trump backed off and the Republican-controlled Congress hasn’t approved new gun control bills.That fact and the decision by Trump and Pence to attend this week’s convention is a sign that the NRA remains a powerful force. Donations to the organization actually surged after Parkland.As rank-and-file members gather, board member Tom King says the NRA will once again make the case that firearms aren’t the real public safety issue.The focus should be on other things, including more security in schools, King says. “Until we talk about the core issues, getting people jobs, getting the criminals off the streets, stopping the drug trade, we are going to be a dangerous country.”Copyright 2018 NCPR. To see more, visit NCPR. Sharelast_img read more

Political Roundup Pres Trump Visits Crosby And Developments At The Texas Legislature

first_img Share Listen 00:00 /08:45 X On this week’s installment of the political roundup, the Houston Matters experts discuss Pres. Trump’s rally in the Houston area, the onslaught of leadership changes in the administration’s cabinet, to the latest developments at the Texas Legislature.In the audio above, Craig Cohen discusses those and other stories with Brandon Rottinghaus from the University of Houston and co-host of Houston Public Media’s Party Politics podcast, and Houston Chronicle columnist Erica Grieder. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Of war unsung heroes

first_imgCommemorating the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War, American Centre in collaboration with Cinedarbaar is organising a two-day Civil War  Film Festival, commencing on June 5. Five films (docu-fiction) that tells the stories of civil war will be screened during this festival. The opening day of the festival will screen two films – Glory and Lincoln. Glory starring  Matthew Broderick, Denzel Washington, Cary Elwe  is about the US Civil War’s first all-black volunteer company, fighting prejudices of both its own Union army and the Confederate.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The next film to be screened is  Lincoln starring Daniel Day-Lewis that showcases America’s president struggles with continuing carnage on the battlefield as he fights with many inside his own cabinet on the decision to emancipate the slaves. The second day of the festival will show films like Gettysburg by Ronald F Maxwell and The Red Badge of Courage. Gettysburg shares experiences of the war drama, which depicts one of the biggest events of the American Civil War, the Battle of Gettysburg.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe Red Badge of Courage is a 1951 war film, which showcases the truncated adaptation of Stephen Crane’s novel about a Civil War Union soldier, who struggles to find the courage to fight in the heat of battle. The closing film of the festival is an epic war drama film written and directed by Anthony Minghella called Cold Mountain. The theme of the festival is the war between the States, also known as Civil War. By the time it ended with Confederate surrender in 1865, the Civil War proved to be the costliest war ever fought on American soil. The different films to be screened at the festival will help the audience understand the history from different perspectives of film makers.  Discussions on Civil war history will follow the screenings where themes highlighted in the film will be talked about. A quiz on the civil war will also be organised based on the films screened for the audience to win exciting prizes sponsored by the American Centre. Entry to the festival is free.When: June 5 – 6     Where: The Amercan Centrelast_img read more

Windows 10 October 2018 Update Is Official What to Expect

first_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GameIf you’re over 40 – this game is a must!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoKelley Blue Book5 Mid-engine Corvettes That Weren’tKelley Blue BookUndoGrepolis – Free Online GameGamers Around the World Have Been Waiting for this GameGrepolis – Free Online GameUndoForbes.comCrazy Rich Asians for RealForbes.comUndoTODAYPolice Identify Girl Licking Ice Cream Tub In Viral VideoTODAYUndoMy Food and FamilyHealthy, Homemade Drunken Thai Noodles In Just 20 MinutesMy Food and FamilyUndoAdvertisement BERLIN — Microsoft just announced that the next update to Windows is coming in October, packed with new features for more than 700 million Windows users.The company revealed the name (Windows 10 October 2018 Update) and launch month on-stage at IFA, but didn’t specify the exact day users would be able to install the software update.MacBook Air vs MacBook Pro: Which 13-inch MacBook Is Right For You?Apple’s entry-level MacBook Air and Pro look pretty similar, but our testing proved they differ in crucial ways.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9关闭选项Automated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-USAutomated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/windows-10-october-2018-update-release-date?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0003:4603:46 Microsoft Vice President Erin Chapple said Windows Insider program members will be able to test drive the new features soon.So what new features will Windows users see in October? A Shared Clipboard feature will let you share files across devices and an overhauled Notepad are on the docket, but Microsoft says it will share more about upcoming features in the weeks to come.Image Credit: MicrosoftThe Best Lenovo Laptops of IFA 2018How to Use Windows 10Best 2-in-1s (Laptop/Tablet Hybrids)last_img read more

Anker Deals of the Week Soundbuds Slim 19 Off Roav Dash Cam

first_imgThe second deal is on the Roav Dash Cam C1 which is a high-end recorder for your car that is packed with a lot of great features. It can record video in 1080p and packs a Sony Exmor sensor that has a wide field of view, capable of seeing clearly even in dimly lit surroundings. That’s not all, this thing is motion-activated too, so you can rest assured that it will turn on if someone bumps into your car intentionally or even accidentally.Buy Roav Dash Cam C1 – Use code C1CARCAM at checkout to get the discount [Amazon link] Apart from Anker’s Monday deals, the company is offering more discounts today. This includes the Anker Soundbuds Slim and the Roav Dash Cam C1.Anker Deals: Get the Soundbuds Slim 19% Off their Retail Price and Roav Dash Cam C1 21% OffAnker kicked off this week with a wide variety of deals on a lot of its cool products. Now it has come to light that we have more Anker deals to care about, which includes discounts on the Soundbuds Slim and the Roav Dash Cam C1.Anker Soundbuds Slim – Regular price $25.99, Now just $20.99 Kicking things off are the Soundbuds Slim, which are essentially Bluetooth headphones with great sound. These are IPX5 rated which means that they are ready to go to the gym if you are and won’t mind a few splashes of water either. But that’s not all, they pack a design that ensures that these earbuds don’t fall out of your ears, with things being topped off with more than decent battery life.Buy Anker Soundbuds Slim [Amazon link]Roav Dash Cam C1 – Regular price $69.99, Now just $54.99center_img Share Tweet Submitlast_img read more

Numerous Resources for IIPs Available from SIIM

first_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Videos | Information Technology | June 28, 2012 Numerous Resources for IIPs Available from SIIM Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Paul Nagy, Ph.D., CIIP, and Christopher Meenan, CIIP, discuss some of the opportunities available for Imaging Informatics Professionals (IIPs) at the Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting and through SIIM’s programs and website — all of which are especially relevant in light of today’s explosion of innovation in the imaging informatics arena. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Technology Reports View all 9 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items center_img RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Conference Coverage View all 396 items Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Recent Videos View all 606 items Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Women’s Health View all 62 items Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Find more news and videos from AAPM. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Information Technology View all 220 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Numerous Resources for IIPs Available from SIIMVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 3:36Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -3:36 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more

2 more German sect members face prison in DomRep

first_imgSANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) – A judge in the Dominican Republic has ordered two more German members of a doomsday sect to jail after police accused them of participating in a deadly shootout.Daniel Brunck joins his father Peter Brunck in a yearlong preventive detention while police investigate. Forty-six-year-old Isabella Dietrich faces three months.Peter Brunck is the apparent leader of a sect called the “Academy for Future Health.” Get a lawn your neighbor will be jealous of Former Arizona Rep. Don Shooter shows health improvement Construction begins on Chandler hospital expansion project Police said late Thursday that Dietrich was the girlfriend of Peter Demetrick, who was killed during Wednesday’s gunbattle at an upscale house in Sosua.The shooting occurred during a police raid after neighbors complained about hearing shots at the house, which has an indoor shooting range. They confiscated weapons including grenades and crossbows. Brunck denied they were his during a preliminary court hearing.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.) Sponsored Stories Mary Coyle ice cream to reopen in central Phoenixcenter_img Top Stories Arizona families, Arizona farms: A legacy of tradition embracing animal care and comfort through modern technology Comments   Share   Bottoms up! Enjoy a cold one for International Beer Day 4 must play golf courses in Arizonalast_img read more

Queen Mary 2 Australian Circumnavigation on sale July 13

first_imgCarnival’s Partnership members in Australia will be the first agents to be able to sell the anticipated QM2 Circumnavigation cruise, following its release to past passengers or registered clients on 13 July 2010. From 1am on July 14, Partnership agents will be able to process bookings, almost 12 hours before other agents will be provided access. More than 2500 people have already pre-registered their interest in the historic voyage around Australia in 2012, and with bookings opening to Australian operators before international markets, CEO Carnival Australia, Ann Sherry said it reflects the expected local popularity of the cruise.“Since we announced this voyage in March, we’ve had more than 2500 people register on our special website, which equates to more than 5000 potential passengers,” she said.“Based on this early interest we’re anticipating strong bookings when the voyage goes on sale.”The QM2 is the largest ship ever to visit Australia, and will call at eight Australian ports as well as a stop to Bali on the 22 day Circumnavigation departing Sydney on February 14 2010. The deployment is the longest QM2 will have been based in a country outside of her northern hemisphere homeports of Southampton and New York.Expressions of interest can be logged at www.queenmary2.com.au/register <a href=”http://www.etbtravelnews.global/click/29985/” target=”_blank”><img src=”http://adsvr.travelads.biz/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=10&amp;cb=INSERT_RANDOM_NUMBER_HERE&amp;n=a5c63036″ border=”0″ alt=””></a> Source = e-Travel Blackboard: D.Mlast_img read more