Rangers charged by UEFA over late kick-off in Moscow

first_imgRangers have been hit with a disciplinary charge from UEFA over their Europa League match against Spartak Moscow last week.Both clubs have been cited for the match failing to kick-off exactly on time. The game kicked off two minutes later than the scheduled time.Television footage appears to show striker Alfredo Morelos late in joining his teammates in the tunnel before the game, with the match referee holding both teams from taking to the pitch until the full complement of players are present.UEFA operate a strict liability process over disciplinary issues, so Rangers will have to state their case to the governing body before the case if heard by their Control, Ethics and Disciplinary Body on 13 December. Spartak Moscow will face more serious charges in addition to the timekeeping issue. The Russian club have been cited for their fans setting off fireworks and throwing objects, with a further charge relating to blocked stairways inside the Otkritie Arena.last_img read more

Thulani Madondo: a South African hero

first_img8 October 2012A South African man from Kliptown in Soweto is one of 10 finalists for the 2012 CNN Hero of the Year award, an annual campaign which honours everyday people doing good deeds in their communities.Within hours of hearing about his nomination, Thulani Madondo has gone from being a relatively unknown Soweto resident with a heart to change the lives of children, to gaining international celebrity status.Madondo is one of 45 000 nominees from more than 100 countries.Winners are decided entirely by public vote, and you can vote for him on www.CNNheroes.com by clicking on his name. Voting closes on 28 November 2012 and the winners will be announced on 2 December.Helping children to dreamMadondo was nominated for his work with the Kliptown Youth Programme (KYP), which provides meals for children, support with school fees, after-school care as well as educational help and tutoring to about 400 disadvantaged children from the Kliptown area.The organisation has also made it possible for 18 youths to get tertiary education.Madondo is a founder of the organisation and its chairperson. He works with a team of permanent staff and volunteers to inspire children who are growing up in difficult circumstances to have dreams and hope for the future.The main focus of the initiative is its tutoring programme, which runs four days a week. It provides tutoring for grade two to seven pupils, and uses professional teachers to help grade eight to 12 children with subjects such as maths and science.“To achieve this means a lot. It is an honour and privilege and we feel we have already achieved a lot just by being in the top 10,’ Madondo says.“It gives us hope to receive this type of exposure and recognition for the work we do.’Each of the finalists will receive R412 000 (US$50 000) for their organisation and the winner gets about R2-million ($250 000).Changing a community, one child at a timeMadondo is Soweto’s ordinary hero who has made it his life mission to change his community.Growing up in Kliptown, in a one-room shack that he shared with seven other siblings, he knows the challenges of young people in this area.His family didn’t have enough money to keep him and all his siblings in school, but he was determined not to drop out.He washed cars to earn enough money to pay his school fees, and went on to become the first member of his family to graduate from high school.With his schooling behind him, he wanted to become an accountant, but his family didn’t have the means to send him to university.Looking back on his childhood, Madondo realised that education is the most powerful tool to empower people, and this led him to co-found the KYP.“We feel education is the only key out of these challenging conditions that people live in,’ he says.Kliptown is one of the oldest residential areas of Soweto and is home to about 45 000 people. Here people live in informal housing, some don’t have access to services such as electricity and there is a high rate of unemployment.Many children from this community drop out of school because they don’t have school uniforms and text books.Learning how communities workMadondo set out to educate himself on everything to do with community development. Soon after completing high school in 2001 he participated in the City Year Programme (an intensive year of leadership training and skills development) in Johannesburg’s Yeoville community.Through the programme he had an opportunity to travel to the US, where he met former US president Bill Clinton.Then he received his community development practitioner certificate from Wits University and his certificate in community development at the University of Johannesburg.Today he is in charge of national and international fundraising for the KYP and provides regular guided tours through Kliptown.“When we started the organisation I thought I would do it part time and then still look for a job, but this ended up being my fulltime job,’ he explains.A deserved nominationMadondo was nominated for the award by Prof Ilhan Akbil from Fortham University in New York, after the KYP hosted the professor and a group of student volunteers.“He was so impressed with the work we do that he asked me if he could nominate me,’ he says.“I never thought this would happen. I suppose good things come to those who wait.’Through his community work, Madondo wants to emulate the life of one of his biggest heroes, South African freedom fighter Nelson Mandela.“This is someone who prioritised peace in the country and through his sense of humour made South Africa a very special country to live in,’ he says.And does Madondo plan to one day go back to university to get his degree in accounting?“Probably not,’ he says. “I have found my new passion.’First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

After visits with Vesta and Ceres, asteroid-exploring Dawn spacecraft goes dark

first_img NASA/JPL-CALTECH/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA *Update, 1 November, 1:55 p.m.: After several missed attempts to communicate with Dawn over the past 2 days, NASA declared that the spacecraft had run out of hydrazine and reached the end of its mission. Here is our original coverage from 17 October.After an 11-year journey to Vesta and Ceres, the asteroid belt’s two largest members, NASA’s Dawn spacecraft is expected to run out of thruster fuel in the next few weeks, ending its mission. The robotic explorer, which gave a close-up view of how the presence or absence of water can shape asteroids, will remain tumbling in orbit around Ceres for decades before ultimately crashing into it.Launched in 2007, Dawn is the only NASA mission to orbit two planetary bodies, a feat made possible by its efficient ion thrusters. In 2011, it arrived at the egg-shaped, 600-kilometer-long Vesta, orbiting for a year before departing for Ceres, where it arrived in 2015.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The two asteroids, which together account for 45% of the belt’s mass, turned out to be a tale of contrasts. Parched Vesta has a composition like the terrestrial planets, with an iron core and a dry, rocky surface carved up into canyons, craters, and mountains, remnants of past impacts and volcanism. Dawn was able to verify that a class of meteorites found on Earth are chips off of Vesta, making it a sort of “reverse sample return mission,” says Carol Raymond, the mission’s principal investigator and a planetary scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California.Telescopes had already found water-rich minerals on Ceres, a 900-kilometer-wide body classified as a dwarf planet because of its large size and spherical shape. Dawn revealed the remnants of a frozen ocean topped by a heavily cratered crust of clays and salts. “We could not have imagined it would have looked like this,” Raymond says.The young sun could have boiled away much of the water if Ceres had formed in its present location. So, some scientists suspect it was born out past Jupiter and Saturn, only to be drawn in by the gas giants’ turbulent early gyrations. Dawn found a marker of this distant birthplace: ammonia, a volatile molecule that could have only formed in the outer solar system. Related Kepler, NASA’s planet-hunting space telescope, is dead After visits with Vesta and Ceres, asteroid-exploring Dawn spacecraft goes darkcenter_img By Paul VoosenNov. 1, 2018 , 2:05 PM Ceres’s Occator crater contains an ice-spewing cryovolcano. Dawn also spotted a sign that Ceres remains geologically active: what looked like a lone volcano, 4 kilometers tall, that oozes a “lava” of water, salt, and other materials. Later observations spotted traces of 21 more volcanoes. And more than 100 bright spots rich in salt also suggested the subsurface ice finds its way to the surface here and there, as a slushy brine. One such spot, at Ernutet crater, showed signs of organic molecules—common in the outer solar system and not a signifier of life. But the discoveries have made Ceres a prime candidate for further exploration; a NASA study on a possible lander is expected to conclude next year.In its final months, Dawn settled into a tight orbit, just 35 kilometers from Ceres’s surface. The defunct craft could remain in orbit for a half-century or more, says Marc Rayman, Dawn’s mission director at JPL, “an inert celestial monument around the dwarf planet it helped unveil.”last_img read more